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24 Jan 2008 : Column 2141W—continued


Peacekeeping Operations

Dr. Fox: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which military units are allocated for potential deployment with (a) EU and (b) NATO missions. [179676]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: The allocation of military units for all deployments with EU and NATO missions takes place on a case by case basis via the UK’s force generation process, according to national priorities, and drawn from those declared to the Defence Planning process for NATO and the Headline Questionnaire for the EU.
24 Jan 2008 : Column 2142W
Within these forces, some units are held at high readiness and designated for potential deployment with the EU and NATO but these would not deploy without the express consent of the UK Government.

For EU missions, the UK’s contribution to the EU Battle Group roster in the second half of 2008 will be drawn from the Small Scale Focused Intervention Battlegroup element of the Joint Rapid Reaction Force.

For NATO missions, the UK has agreed to provide a battalion to NATO’s Operational Reserve Force (ORF) until the end of 2008. On current plans, up to the end of the first half of 2008, the Spearhead Land Element(SLE) of the Joint Rapid Reaction Force (JRRF) will meet this requirement.

The UK is also providing a contribution to the NATO Response Force (NRF) throughout 2008 to be drawn as appropriate from the Joint Rapid Reaction Force. From January-June 2008 this will be one carrier and associated aircraft together with an escort ship (a destroyer or frigate); and a deployable air operating base (including four Tornado GR4 aircraft, and associated air-to-air refuelling, airborne early warning, and tactical air transport aircraft). From July-December 2008 the UK’s contribution to the NRF will be four air defence aircraft and eight ground attack aircraft together with associated air-to-air refuelling, airborne early warning, and tactical air transport aircraft; and a mine counter measures task group (including a command ship, a destroyer/frigate escort, and a survey vessel).

Prince William

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 14 January 2008, Official Report, columns 887-8W, on Prince William, whether Prince William’s training will enable his transfer to an operational commission unit for (a) fast jet, (b) multi-engine and (c) rotary wing aircraft. [181166]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: HRH Prince William’s attachment to the Royal Air Force is part of a wider programme of events and is designed to prepare him for his future role. It will not be possible in the time available for him to progress to an Operational Conversion Unit for fast jet, multi-engine or rotary wing aircraft before he goes on attachment to the Royal Navy.

Reserve Forces: Mental Health Services

Dr. Murrison: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department is taking to provide reservists with operational-related mental health problems with access to NHS healthcare. [181147]

Derek Twigg: Any reserve serviceman or woman injured when on operational deployment is entitled to and will receive the same level of medical treatment and support as their regular colleagues. This may include treatment at a military Department of Community Mental Health (DCMH) or admission to the Priory Group. They will continue to receive treatment until they are deemed to have reached a steady state of fitness. They are then demobilised, and taken through a transition from military to NHS care, if they have continuing healthcare needs.


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Once demobilised, it is a long established tradition that reserve forces’ medical care becomes the responsibility of their own local NHS primary care trust and the majority of veterans’ physical and mental health needs are met by these provisions. However, we recognise that many health professionals may have limited experience of dealing with individuals with mental health symptoms arising from their service experience, and some reservists may be concerned that there will be only limited understanding by GPs of the context of their illness. In these specific circumstances, MOD recognises that it has an expertise to offer, and in November 2006 it launched the Reserves Mental Health Programme (RMHP).

The RMHP is open to any current or former member of the UK volunteer and regular reserves who has been demobilised since 1 January 2003 following an overseas operational deployment as a reservist, and who believes that the deployment may have adversely affected their mental health. Under the programme, we liaise with the individual’s GP and offer a mental health assessment at the Reserves Training and Mobilisation Centre (RTMC) in Chilwell, Nottinghamshire. If diagnosed to have a combat-related mental health condition, we then offer out-patient treatment via one of the 15 DCMHs. If more acute cases present, the Defence Medical Services will assist in arranging for access to NHS in-patient treatment.

In conjunction with the Department of Health, we recently launched the first of a number of community mental health pilots. Each site will have a trained community veterans’ mental health therapist. Veterans will be able to access this service directly or through their GP, ex-service organisations, the Veterans’ Welfare Service, or Social Service departments. The pilot at the Staffordshire and Shropshire Foundation Healthcare Trust is now open. This will be followed by pilots in Camden and Islington, Cardiff, Middlesbrough, St. Austell and Scotland. If these pilots prove successful the model will be rolled out more widely across the UK.

As an interim measure, and to assist those veterans not in the catchment areas of one of the new community mental health pilots, we have expanded of our Medical Assessment Programme (MAP) based at St. Thomas’ Hospital, London, to include assessment of veterans with mental health symptoms with operational service from 1982 (including veterans of the Falklands campaign).

Veterans who have recently deployed to Iraq (Operation Telic) and Afghanistan (Operation Herrick) may also attend for a full medical assessment if their Service Medical Officer or General Practitioner thinks it would help. The MAP was established in 1993 for veterans of the 1990-91 Gulf conflict and we encourage veterans worried about their health to attend. The clinician in charge also provides support and advice to GPs and other civilian health professionals requiring advice on the military aspects of treatment.

Leader of the House

Departmental ICT

Susan Kramer: To ask the Leader of the House how many (a) male and (b) female members of staff in her Office were issued with personal digital assistants in each year since 2001; and if she will make a statement. [181362]


24 Jan 2008 : Column 2144W

Ms Harman: Following a machinery of government change, information prior to 2006-07 is available only at disproportionate cost.

Since May 2006 two male and two female members of staff have been issued with personal digital assistants.

House Committees: Salary

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Leader of the House which chairmen of House Committees receive a salary in addition to that of an hon. Member to reflect their role as chairman. [181568]

Ms Harman: Under the resolutions of the House of 30 October 2003 and 13 July 2005 relating to pay for chairmen of Select Committees, the chairmen of the departmental Select Committees appointed under Standing Order No. 152, together with the chairmen of the Environmental Audit, European Scrutiny, Public Accounts, Public Administration, Regulatory Reform, Administration, Finance and Services, Liaison, Procedure, Selection and Standards and Privileges Select Committees, and the chairmen of the Joint Committees on Human Rights and on Statutory Instruments, receive an additional salary in respect of their role as chairmen. A total of 31 hon. Members receive such a salary.

Under the Resolution of the House of 13 July relating to pay for chairmen of Standing Committees (now General Committees), the members of the Chairmen’s Panel—in addition to the three Deputy Speakers also receive an additional (graduated) salary, unless they are already in receipt of such a salary as chairman of a Select Committee. A total of 32 hon. Members receive such a salary.

Timetabling of Bills

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Leader of the House if she will commission and publish an independent assessment of the effect of programming on the passage of Government legislation, including information on (a) the number of Government amendments made at Third Reading in the House of Lords and (b) the length of time taken between introduction and enactment of Government bills (i) in the last three years and (ii) in the last three years before the introduction of programming. [180193]

Ms Harman: The effect of programming of Government legislation has been the subject of number of reports by the Modernisation and Procedure Committees of the House and therefore it is not proposed to commission an independent audit.

The total number of amendments, including Government amendments, to Government Bills at Lords Third Reading in the following Sessions were:

Session Number

2006-07

80

2005-06

440

2004-05

119

2003-04

428

2002-03

540

2001-02

306

2000-01

56

1999-2000

741

1998-99

460

1997-98

412

Source:
House of Lords Public Bill Sessional Statistics

24 Jan 2008 : Column 2145W

These figures are not broken down into ‘Government’ and ‘non-Government’ amendments, and it is important to remember that some amendments might have been tabled by a non-Government peer but inspired by the Government and that some amendments may have been tabled by the Government but in response to concerns raised by an MP or peer.

Information about the interval between introduction and enactment of legislation for Government Bills in previous Sessions is a matter of public record, which is contained in the Library’s Sessional Information Digests available at:

Wales

Capita

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how much was paid by his Department to Capita Group plc and its subsidiaries in each financial year since 2000; which contracts were awarded by his Department to Capita Group plc in each year from 2000-01 to the most recent available date; what the cost was of each contract; what penalties for default were imposed in contract provisions; what the length was of each contract; whether the contract was advertised; how many companies applied for the contract; how many were short-listed; what criteria were used for choosing a company; what provision was made for renewal without re-tender in each case; and if he will make a statement. [180695]

Huw Irranca-Davies: My Department has no contracts with Capita Group plc or its subsidiaries.

Departmental ICT

Dr. Cable: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what the (a) start date, (b) original planned completion date, (c) current expected completion date, (d) planned cost and (e) current estimated cost is for each information technology project being undertaken by his Department; and if he will make a statement. [180578]

Huw Irranca-Davies: My Department began work, in November 2007, on the development of new English and Welsh language websites.

The original completion date for the sites was the end of December 2007, however following revisions, the new websites are due to be launched by the end of January 2008.

The planned cost of the project is £29,611.

Susan Kramer: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many (a) male and (b) female members of staff in his Department were issued with personal digital assistants in each year since 2001; and if he will make a statement. [181369]

Huw Irranca-Davies: My Department has not issued staff members with personal digital assistants.


24 Jan 2008 : Column 2146W

Picture Financial Group

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what meetings he has had in a ministerial capacity with representatives of Picture Financial Group in the last 12 months; what the date of each meeting was; who was present at each meeting; and what the purpose of each meeting was. [181017]

Huw Irranca-Davies: Ministers meet many people as part of the process of policy development and advice. It is not the usual practice of Government to disclose details of such meetings.

Home Department

Antisocial Behaviour: Prosecutions

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions under the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 there have been for (a) noise, (b) graffiti and fly-posting and (c) waste and litter in (i) each local authority and (ii) each police authority area, broken down by basic command unit, in each region of England and Wales in each year since the introduction of the powers. [176312]

Jonathan Shaw: I have been asked to reply.

The offences in the Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003 include graffiti and fly-posting. Other offences are taken under different legislation.

The number of prosecutions taken at magistrates courts is held by the Ministry of Justice. The offence class of ‘other’ criminal damage includes, but cannot separately identify, offences of graffiti. Data on fly-posting offences cannot be separately identified from the data held by the Ministry of Justice.


24 Jan 2008 : Column 2147W
Prosecutions for ‘other’ criminal damage
Police force area 2003 2004 2005 2006

England

Avon and Somerset

814

652

576

240

Bedfordshire

35

58

53

206

Cambridgeshire

309

252

233

152

Cheshire

12

51

51

177

City of London

16

11

11

Cleveland

162

75

29

12

Cumbria

28

49

91

83

Derbyshire

362

346

244

185

Devon and Cornwall

12

6

63

1,016

Dorset

2

2

4

Durham

195

156

76

88

Essex

565

522

561

486

Gloucestershire

141

162

178

245

Greater Manchester

1,329

1,467

1,424

1,457

Hampshire

667

767

374

510

Hertfordshire

48

135

189

108

Humberside

39

185

90

81

Kent

539

718

656

713

Lancashire

25

24

39

183

Leicestershire

67

81

91

62

Lincolnshire

9

68

95

106

Merseyside

271

201

70

85

Metropolitan Police

1,970

1,798

1,465

1,422

Norfolk

362

318

356

245

North Yorkshire

241

372

365

305

Northamptonshire

299

259

289

308

Northumbria

14

11

15

29

Nottinghamshire

14

10

136

200

South Yorkshire

404

422

442

412

Staffordshire

615^

551

543

520

Suffolk

14

52

168

417

Surrey

93

72

196

404

Sussex

587

367

463

513

Thames Valley

478

370

410

356

Warwickshire

81

59

42

22

West Mercia

102

145

162

161

West Midlands

1,269

1,409

1,090

1,024

West Yorkshire

467

441

440

410

Wiltshire

85

61

68

44

Wales

Dyfed-Powys

9

11

15.

10

Gwent

345

223

74

98

North Wales

297

326

378

315

South Wales

459

96

66

53


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