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6 Feb 2007 : Column 822W—continued


Details of missions opened since 1997-98
April to March Country Post name Status Opened

1997-98

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Banja Luka

BEO

1

1999-2000

China

Chongqing

BCG

1

1999-2000

Sweden

Gothenburg

BCG

1

2000-01

Guinea

Conakry

BC

1

2000-01

Mali

Bamako(1)

BC

1

2000-01

Haiti

Port-au-Prince

BC

1

2000-01

USA

Denver

BC

1

2000-01

Serbia and Montenegro

Pristina

BO

1

2000-01

Libya

Tripoli

Embassy

1

2001-02

Afghanistan

Kabul

Embassy

1

2001-02

Korea DPR

Pyongyang

Embassy

1

2001-02

Tajikistan

Dushanbe

Embassy

1

2002-03

Moldova

Chisinau

Embassy

1

2002-03

East Timor

Dili(1)

Embassy

1

2004-05

Iraq

Baghdad

Embassy

1

2004-05

Iraq

Basra

BCG

1

2004-05

Iraq

Kirkuk

BEO

1

2006-07

Kazakhstan

Almaty(2)

BEO

1

Total

18

(1) Posts opened and closed during this period.
(2) Office left in place after embassy relocation to Astana.
Note:
Key to abbreviations:
BE—British Embassy
BEO—British Embassy Office
BHC—British High Commission
BO—British Office
BCG—British Consulate General.

Falkland Islands

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions she has had with (a) the government in Port Stanley and (b) her counterpart in Buenos Aires on the Falkland Islands' relations with Argentina. [118974]

Mr. Hoon: There is a close and continuing dialogue between the Government and Falkland Island Government on a wide range of issues including relations with Argentina, for which the Government have responsibility. In our frequent discussions with Argentina, the UK has made it clear that it values its relationship with Argentina and wants it to be as constructive and as positive as possible. The Government and Falkland Island Government are willing to consider closer co-operation with the Argentine Government on matters of mutual interest, provided it is understood that the issue of sovereignty over the Falkland Islands and other UK overseas territories is not negotiable.


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Horn of Africa and Sudan

Andrew Mackinlay: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which of her Department's officials met (a) individuals and (b) groups party to the conflicts in (i) the Horn of Africa and (ii) Sudan in London in the last 12 months; what the purpose was of each meeting; and which individuals were met in each case. [111518]

Mr. McCartney: Officials meet frequently with many of the parties to the conflicts in the Horn of Africa and Sudan. We do not divulge the names of the officials involved in those meetings because it could be detrimental to the UK's ability to influence representatives of foreign Governments and other parties in resolving those conflicts.

Human Rights Monitoring

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how human rights monitoring is undertaken by overseas UK diplomatic missions and embassies. [112294]

Mr. McCartney: UK diplomatic missions monitor a wide range of human rights issues around the world. Monitoring normally includes contacts with interested parties, including relevant parts of the Government of the country concerned, international organisations, relevant international and domestic civil society organisations, political contacts, faith groups and the media. Depending on the issues in a particular country, it might also include observation by embassy officials of trials, elections, prison conditions, policing methods, treatment of women or minority groups, or work with local human rights defenders. Posts also use reports of international organisations and non-governmental organisations.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office annual human rights report provides an overview of the main challenges to human rights around the world and the UK’s activities and policies in response. The latest report was published on 12 October 2006. It can be found on the FCO website at: http://www.fco. gov.uk/servlet/Front?pagename=OpenMarket/Xcelerate/ShowPage&c=Page&cid=1159199103169.

Copies of the report are also available in the Library of the House.

Human Trafficking

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports she has received on trafficked children being compelled to work harvesting cocoa beans; and if she will make a statement. [118000]

Mr. McCartney: We continue to be concerned about media reports of children trafficked into working in cocoa farms. We support international efforts, including the work of the International Labour Organisation, the governments concerned, the cocoa industry and civil society to eradicate these practices. The eradication of all the worst forms of child labour, as outlined in ILO convention 182, is one of our human rights priorities.


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In 2001, the UK discussed the working practices of the cocoa industry in West Africa with various bodies including manufacturers, retailers, non-governmental organisations and producer governments. We continue to monitor the situation and will make representations as necessary.

Iraq

Mr. Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans she has to visit Iraq in the near future. [117908]

Dr. Howells: Foreign engagements for my right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary and other Ministers are kept under constant review. It is not our practice to announce such visits until they are firm. Because of the unpredictable nature of world events, final decisions on overseas visits are often not possible until very shortly before the day of travel.

Mr. Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many personnel from her Department are based in Kurdish north Iraq. [117907]

Dr. Howells: There are three Foreign and Commonwealth officers based in Erbil.

Mr. Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many regions of Iraq previously under British responsibility have been handed back to Iraqi control. [117909]

Dr. Howells: Of the four Iraqi provinces originally under British control, two have now been handed over to Iraqi control—Dhi Qar and Al Muthanna. The Iraqi Prime Minister has said that he hopes to have all provinces transferred to Iraqi control by November 2007.

Kenya

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if she will instigate a public inquiry into the conduct of the British colonial administration in Kenya during the 1950s emergency; what representations her Department has received on the treatment of Kenyans by the British colonial administration in this period from (a) (i) governments and (ii) citizens of Kenya and (b) others; and if she will make a statement. [111258]

Mr. McCartney: We have no plans to instigate a public inquiry into events during the emergency period in the 1950s in Kenya. We have received no formal representations on this issue from other governments, Kenyan citizens or any other individuals. We have received correspondence on Mau Mau related issues from members of the public over the years, reflecting a wide range of views.

I understand the strong feelings that the Mau Mau issue still creates in Kenya and elsewhere. The emergency period caused a great deal of pain for many on all sides and marred progress towards independence. It is regrettable this was not achieved without violence.


6 Feb 2007 : Column 825W

We are looking to the future. The task now is to tackle today's challenges—building a strong and prosperous democracy in Kenya and fighting corruption and poverty.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions she has had with the Kenyan Government on (a) compensation and (b) an apology for those affected by torture and degrading treatment by the British colonial administration during the 1950s Kenyan emergency; and if she will make a statement. [111302]

Mr. McCartney: The Kenyan Government have not raised these issues with us and we have had no discussions with them on the subject. The events surrounding the Mau Mau insurgency remain a deeply divisive issue within Kenya and one which historians continue to debate.

The important issue now is for both our countries to look to the future and build on our existing strong partnership in the interests of Kenya’s long-term development.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if she will issue an apology to the Kenyan victims of (a) torture and (b) victims of degrading treatment by the British colonial authorities during the 1950s Kenyan emergency; and if she will make a statement. [111329]

Mr. McCartney: I understand the strong feelings that the Mau Mau issue still creates in Kenya and elsewhere. The events surrounding the Mau Mau insurgency remain a deeply divisive issue within Kenya and one which historians continue to debate. The emergency period caused a great deal of pain for many on all sides and marred progress towards independence. It is regrettable this was not achieved without violence.

We are looking to the future. The task now is to tackle today’s challenges—building a strong and prosperous democracy in Kenya and fighting corruption and poverty.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if she will offer compensation to those Kenyan victims of (a) torture and (b) degrading or inhuman treatment by the British colonial authorities during the 1950s Kenyan emergency; and if she will make a statement. [111330]

Mr. McCartney: The Government have no plans to offer compensation to those affected by the events of the emergency period in Kenya in the 1950s.

I understand the strong feelings that the Mau Mau issue still creates in Kenya and elsewhere. The emergency period caused a great deal of pain for many on all sides and marred progress towards independence. It is regrettable this was not achieved without violence.

We are looking to the future. The task now is to tackle today’s challenges—building a strong and prosperous democracy and fighting corruption and poverty.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what estimate
6 Feb 2007 : Column 826W
she has made of the number of Kenyans unlawfully (a) tortured, (b) imprisoned, (c) subjected to degrading and inhumane treatment and (d) killed during the 1950s Kenyan emergency; what estimate she has made of the number who died as a result; and if she will make a statement; [111331]

(2) if she will make an estimate of the number of former colonial officials allegedly responsible for torture and deaths of Kenyans during the 1950s Kenyan emergency; and if she will make a statement; [111334]

(3) if she will make an estimate of the number of Kenyan women subjected to sexual abuse during the 1950s Kenyan emergency by British colonial officials and military personnel; and if she will make a statement. [111335]

Mr. McCartney: We have made no estimates in relation to the alleged abuses outlined in my hon. Friend’s questions. All records dating back to that period were either passed to the Kenyan Government at independence or have been subsequently transferred to the national archive in Kew.

The emergency period in the 1950s was a very difficult period for all involved. We are now working with the Kenyan Government to tackle today’s challenges—building a strong and prosperous democracy and fighting corruption and poverty in Kenya.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what records have been kept of the number of Kenyans who died of disease during their detention without trial during the Kenyan emergency of the 1950s; and if she will make a statement; [111336]

(2) what records have been kept of the extent to which the treatment of Kenyan detainees by the colonial administration during the 1950s Kenyan emergency was sanctioned by the British Government; and if she will make a statement; [111337]

(3) what records exist of the whereabouts of (a) Dedan Kimathi and (b) remains of Kenyan detainees hanged by the British colonial authorities during the Kenyan emergency in the 1950s; and if she will make a statement; [111338]

(4) what records exist of the regulations governing the running by the Colonial authorities of detention camps in Kenya during the 1950s Kenyan emergency; and if she will make a statement. [111341]

Mr. McCartney: All records dating back to the emergency period in Kenya in the 1950s were either passed to the Kenyan Government at independence or have been subsequently transferred to the national archive in Kew.


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