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13 Sep 2006 : Column 2264W—continued

Sheffield Airport

Mr. Heald: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what steps his Department is taking to secure the future of Sheffield airport; and if he will make a statement; [90624]

(2) what assessment he has made of the environmental impact on South Yorkshire of the development of Sheffield Airport. [90625]


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Gillian Merron: Sheffield City airport has incurred substantial losses in the past and commercial services were stopped in August 2002, since when it has operated as a general aviation facility with facilities for commercial airlines now available at the nearby Robin Hood airport.

Sheffield city council has received a planning application for a business park on part of the site, leaving the runway accessible to helicopters and light aircraft. The environmental impact of the development is a matter for the local authority to take into account when considering the planning application.

Speed Cameras

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people were employed in the Essex camera enforcement office in each year since 1997; and what the annual administrative costs were in each year. [90885]

Dr. Ladyman: The Department for Transport does not hold this level of information; it may be available from Essex police.


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Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much revenue speed cameras have generated in Essex in each year since 1997; and how much of that revenue has been spent in Essex. [90886]

Dr. Ladyman: The information on fines and penalties for speeding offences detected by speed cameras in Essex is available for 1999-2003 and is set out in table A which has been provided by the Home Office. I am advised by my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary that his Department’s available information relates to the amount of fines ordered to be paid following speed offences detected by camera, not all of which may have been paid. This table shows all speeding offences in Essex including those detected outside the National Safety Camera Programme in Essex.

Information on the total revenue from offences detected by speed camera is not collected centrally, but an estimate can be made from the number of court imposed fines and fixed penalties and is given in the table from 1997 to 2004 (latest available).

2005 data will be available early in 2007.

Table A: Fixed penalty and court proceedings data for speeding offences detected by cameras( 1) in the Essex police force area, 1999-2003
Fixed penalties Court proceedings
Offence and year Number of tickets( 2) Estimated revenue (£)( 3) Number of fines Total amount of fine (£) Average fine( 4)

1997

18,800

753,700

880

93,900

107

1998

8700

346600

1700

227400

134

1999

19,800

791,400

2,100

357,400

169

2000

46,300

2,007,000

2,800

317,800

115

2001

81,900

4,911,000

6,500

651,200

101

2002

98,100

5,886,000

12,200

1,022,000

84

2003

64,500

3,872,000,

7,400

687,700

93

2004

65,300

3,912,000

6,700

536,900

81

(1) Offences under the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 and the Motor Vehicles (Speed Limits on Motorways) Regulations 1973. (2) Paid i.e. no further action. (3) Estimate based on £40 fixed penalty charge to October 2000. From November 2000 the penalty was raised to £60. (4) Includes cases where fixed penalty notices were originally issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.

The latest available information on the amount recovered and spent in Essex to cover the costs of the Essex Safety Camera Partnership is set out in table B.

Table B: Amount recovered from speed and red light camera offences for Essex Safety Camera Partnership costs as part of the National Safety Camera Programme
Financial year £

2000-01

1,846,480

2001-02

3,179,304

2002-03

5,150,286

2003-04

5,037,293

2004-05

4,622,413


Terrorism

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when the procedures to deal with a serious terrorist alert at London's airports were last exercised prior to August 2006. [90904]

Gillian Merron [holding answer 11 September 2006]: Most recently, the contingency plans were put in place for BAA London airports following the events of 7 July 2005. The National Aviation Security Programme requires the production, development and exercise of security contingency plans by aerodrome managers, aircraft operators and others in the aviation industry. All the London airports regularly undertake their own live and table-top exercises as well as taking part in other agencies' exercises.

Thames Gateway

Mr. Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent representations he has received regarding the proposed Thames Gateway bridge. [90824]

Dr. Ladyman: Ministers in the Department have received a limited number of letters from members of the public on the Thames Gateway bridge over recent months, either directly or via MPs.

Thameslink

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which of the bidders for the renewal of the Thameslink franchise expressed an interest in re-opening the Luton to Dunstable branch line; and why this offer was not taken up. [90705]


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Gillian Merron: None of the bidders involved in last year’s competition for the Thameslink/Great Northern franchise offered to invest in re-opening the Luton to Dunstable branch line.

Traffic Officer Service

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Highways Agency Traffic Officer Service; and if he will make a statement. [90893]

Dr. Ladyman: The Traffic Officer Service was first established in the West Midlands (WM) region in April 2004.

Two targets were set for the WM region in the 2005-06 Highways Agency business plan:

1. For the busiest sections of motorway in the West Midlands, HA Traffic Officers will attend 75 per cent. of incidents within 15 minutes of being deployed.

The WM service achieved 92 per cent. in 15 minutes.

2. In the West Midlands, HA Traffic Officers will clear 75 per cent. of incidents within 30 minutes of taking full responsibility for re-opening the road to traffic.

The WM service achieved 84 per cent.

This experience has enabled the Highways Agency to identify a set of key performance indicators for the service. These indicators will be used to measure the activities that will contribute to delivery of the public sector agreement (PSA) target for journey reliability 2007-08 and to the delivery of the financial benefits of the service. The financial benefits derived from the introduction of the Traffic Officer Service are not due to be assessed until 2008 when the service will have been fully operational across all regions for 12 months. The Highways Agency has analysed data over a 12 month period for the West Midlands and observed a 2 per cent. reduction in incident related congestion.

I would expect the full assessment, which will cover the impacts of introducing the Traffic Officer Service on reducing incident related congestion; improving safety; and freeing up police resources for tackling criminality on the strategic road network to be published at the end of 2008 when the data have been gathered and analysed.

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what has been the cost of the Highways Agency Traffic Officer Service since it was introduced. [90894]

Dr. Ladyman: The cost of the Highways Agency Traffic Officer Service since it was introduced is £180,369,505.00.

Health

Accident and Emergency Departments (Sussex)

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) head count staff and (b) whole-time equivalents work in (i) Brighton Royal Sussex county hospital accident and emergency department and (ii) Worthing hospital accident and emergency department; how many of these are agency staff; and what the annual budget was for staff in each of the last five years. [90973]


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Ms Rosie Winterton: The information is not collected centrally.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many accident and emergency admissions were handled by the Royal Sussex county hospital in Brighton in each of the last five years; what increase in admissions is assumed if the Worthing accident and emergency department is downgraded; and what studies have been carried out to ensure the capacity of Brighton Royal Sussex county hospital to handle an increase in admissions. [90974]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The information is not collected in the requested format. The following table shows the number of admissions to hospital via type one accident and emergency (A&E) for the Brighton and Sussex university hospitals NHS trust and Worthing and Southlands hospitals NHS trust for the last five years.

Number of admissions via type one A&E
Brighton and Sussex university hospitals NHS trust Worthing and Southlands hospitals NHS trust

2005-06

17,331

14,124

2004-05

16,901

13,688

2003-04

15,639

12,168

2002-03

17,779

11,911

2001-02(1)

(2)13,732

(2)7,809

(1 )Prior to Q1 2002-03, Brighton and Sussex university hospitals NHS trust did not exist. Data from before this date are from the two constituent trusts of Brighton Healthcare NHS Trust and Mid Sussex NHS Trust.
(2 )Admissions via A&E were first collected in Q2 2001-02, so that data for 2001-02 are for the last three quarters only.

Anti-psychotic Drug Treatments

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people over the age of 60 years were prescribed anti-psychotic drug treatments on the NHS in (a) England and (b) each strategic health authority in 2005; and if she will make a statement. [90550]

Andy Burnham: Information is not available in the form requested. The Department does not hold data on the number of people who are prescribed medication. However in 2005 the total number of prescriptions dispensed for anti-psychotic drugs in England as a whole was 2,352,000. The number of prescriptions dispensed to those aged 60 and over, by strategic health authority (SHA), is detailed as follows:


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Total number of anti-psychotics prescriptions dispensed to those aged 60 and over in each SHA in England in 2005
SHA Total

Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire

101,000

Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire

63,000

Birmingham and The Black Country

114,000

Chester and Merseyside

121,000

County Durham and Tees Valley

67,000

Cumbria and Lancashire

114,000

Essex

64,000

Greater Manchester

175,000

Hampshire and Isle of White

85,000

Kent and Medway

72,000

Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland

62,000

North and East Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire

85,000

Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire

107,000

North Central London

43,000

North East London

55,000

North West London

58,000

Northumberland, Tyne and Wear

74,000

Shropshire and Staffordshire

70,000

Somerset and Dorset

52,000

South East London

54,000

South West London

55,000

South West Peninsula

76,000

South Yorkshire

68,000

Surrey and Sussex

124,000

Thames Valley

86,000

Trent

124,000

West Midlands South

70,000

West Yorkshire

113,000

Note: All figures are rounded to the nearest 1,000.

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