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9 Jan 2006 : Column 428W—continued

School Buildings

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much money has been allocated for (a) capital repairs and (b) new buildings in (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools in (A) the East Riding of Yorkshire and (B) Kingston upon Hull. [39954]

Jacqui Smith: When we make allocations of capital funding to local authorities we do not prescribe what sums should be spent on new buildings as opposed to repairs and, for the most part, funding is not designated between primary and secondary schools. The allocation of funds is decided by local authorities in accordance with their asset management plans and local priorities. No records are maintained centrally that allow a breakdown of the allocations by the categories requested. Total capital funding allocated in 2005–06 to the East Riding of Yorkshire local authority and schools in its area was £17 million, and total capital funding allocated in 2005–06 to Kingston upon Hull local authority and schools in its area was £8.4 million.
 
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School Funding

Miss Kirkbride: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if she will set out in cash terms the increases for each local education authority in each yearfrom 1997–98 to 2007–08 set out in percentage terms in the school funding settlement published in December. [38888]

Jacqui Smith [holding answer 20 December 2005]: The information requested has been placed in the House Libraries.

School Meals

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of pupils entitled to free school meals achieved (a) 5 GCSEs at grades A* to C, (b) no GCSE qualifications and (c) no qualification in the last year for which figures are available. [38940]

Jacqui Smith [holding answer 20 December 2005]: The available information is given in the following table. Figures for 2005 will be available in February 2006.
Percentage of 15-year-old pupils(102) achieving certain GCSE and equivalent(103) grades by eligibility for Free School Meals (FSM)(104) in 2004

Eligible for FSM
Number of pupils eligible for FSM82,860
Proportion of pupils eligible for FSM achieving(105) (percentage)
5 or more A* to C at GCSE26
No GCSE qualifications12
No qualifications11


(102) Pupils aged 15 at the beginning of the academic year (i.e. 31st of August).
(103) Figures include GCSEs and other approved qualifications.
(104) Figures for attainment by pupil characteristics have been derived from the National Pupil Database (NPD).
(105) These figures are for maintained schools only and are not directly comparable with the national attainment figures that underpin the Department's PSA targets.


Schoolchildren

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what estimate she has made of the number of children of secondary school age in (a) Wellingborough and (b) East Northamptonshire local authority area in each of the next 20 years. [40537]

Jacqui Smith: Population projections for Wellingborough and East Northamptonshire are the responsibility of the Office for National Statistics. The 2003 based projections for the population aged 11 to 18 are:
Estimated and projected population aged 11 to 18 at mid-year

Thousand
WellingboroughEast Northamptonshire
Estimates
20037.99.3
20047.99.6
Projections (2003 base)
20057.89.7
20067.89.8
20077.79.8
20087.79.8
20097.79.9
20107.610.0
20117.610.1
20127.510.2
20137.410.2
20147.410.3
20157.410.4
20167.410.5
20177.410.6
20187.410.6
20197.410.7
20207.410.8
20217.410.8
20227.410.9
20237.310.8

 
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Schools (Charitable Status)

Mr. Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what discussions she has had with the Charity Commission about the likely charitable status of (a) community schools, (b) trust schools, (c) special schools, (d) city academies, (e) pupil referral units, (f) federated schools and (g) foundation schools under the proposals in the Schools White Paper. [38219]

Jacqui Smith: Under current legislation the governing bodies of foundation, voluntary and foundation special schools have charitable status. The foundations of foundation and voluntary schools also have charitable status. In the case of trust schools both their governing bodies and their trusts will have charitable status. Community schools, community special schools and pupil referral units do not have charitable status. Academies are charitable companies limited by guarantee.

Federated schools are not a distinct category of schools, and federations may include any of the categories of maintained schools listed previously (but not pupil referral units, which are not a category of maintained school). Education law does not explicitly provide for the charitable status of the governing body of a federation so the position will depend on general charity law.

The proposals in the White Paper will not affect the charitable status of any of the institutions listed above. We intend to put in place further safeguards around trusts, in particular by requiring them to have specific charitable objects. Officials and legal advisers from my Department have discussed these safeguards with the Charity Commission. As the White Paper explained, we are considering the implications of trust status for special schools, but we do not envisage the need for any discussions with the Charity Commission about this.

Schools White Paper

Mr. Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what discussions she has had with the (a) National Governors Council and (b) National Association of School Governors on the implications for school governors of the proposals in the Schools White Paper. [37670]


 
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Jacqui Smith: Ministers and officials regularly meet the National Governors Council and National Association of School Governors to discuss a wide range of issues. I met them most recently on 15 December 2005 when we discussed the implications of the proposals contained in the Better Schools, Higher Standards For All" White Paper.

Science

Mrs. Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many qualified science lecturers there have been in universities in England in each year since 1997; and if she will make a statement. [22911]

Bill Rammell: The latest available information is given in the table. In 2003/04, changes to the definitions of full-time and part-time staff meant that less academic staff members were classed as full-time. The figures for this year are therefore not directly comparable with those for earlier years.
Full-time academic staff by major subject of highest qualification English HE institutions

Major subject of highest qualification:
Science(106)Other subjectsNot knownTotal
1997/9851,00033,8304,28589,115
1998/9951,50034,7005,48591,685
1999/200051,01535,7204,80091,535
2000/0152,06536,5505,05593,670
2001/0254,66537,2404,94096,845
2002/03(107)56,79036,1304,42597,345
2003/04(108)47,49531,4857,03086,010


(106) Science covers Medicine and Dentistry, Subjects allied to medicine, Biological sciences, Veterinary science, Agriculture and related subjects, Physical sciences, Mathematical sciences, Computer science, Engineering and Technology, and Architecture
(107) A new classification of academic subjects was introduced in 2002/03.
(108) The format and coverage of the Staff Record was changed in 2003/04, one effect of which was to reduce the number of staff classified as full-time and increase the number of staff who were classified as part-time. As a result, the figures for these two years are not directly comparable with those for previous years.
Figures are rounded to the nearest 5.
Source:
The Higher Education Statistics Agency's Staff Record.




Mrs. Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many non-British students have studied sciences at universities in England in each year since 1997; and if she will make a statement; [22925]

(2) how many British students have studied sciences at universities in England in each year since 1997; what percentage were entrants from (a) the state sector and (b) the independent sector; and if she will make a statement. [22931]

Bill Rammell: The latest available information showing the number of students on science courses is shown in the table. Information for 2004/05 will be available in January 2006. Information on the school background of young (under 21) higher education students is published annually by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) in Performance Indicators in Higher Education", but this covers all students and does not show figures for each subject separately. The latest data collected by HESA for 2003/04, covering students of all ages, shows that 11 per cent. of entrants
 
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to undergraduate science courses came from the independent sector, compared to 12 per cent. of entrants to all undergraduate courses of any subject. Comparable figures for earlier years are not available centrally at present.
Higher Education students enrolled on undergraduate science(109) courses

of which, from:
HE institutions in EnglandTotal studentsUKOverseas(110)
1997/98429,815386,44543,370
1998/99444,315402,24542,070
1999/2000452,235410,95541,280
2000/01463,990422,46541,525
2001/02474,360432,58041,780
2002/03524,540477,88046,655
2003/04580,885533,39047,495


(109) Science covers the following subjects: Medicine & Dentistry, Subjects allied to medicine, Biological sciences, Veterinary science, Agriculture & related subjects, Physical sciences, Mathematical sciences, Computer Science, Engineering and Technology, Architecture, Building and Planning.
(110) Including students from the EU.
Note:
Figures based on a snapshot count as at December 1st . Numbers are given to the nearest 5 so components may not sum to totals.
Source:
Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA)





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