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1 Sept 2003 : Column 708W—continued

Telecommunications Masts

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many planning applications have been made to site mobile telecommunications masts on land owned by the Department. [124813]

Ms Hewitt: Since August 2001 when the current planning regulations on mobile telecommunications masts came into force there have been eight planning applications and six applications for prior approval to site mobile telecommunications masts on land owned by the Department.

Wind Farms

Llew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what briefing was provided by her Department's Press Office to the media in advance of her announcement on 14 July on the expansion of offshore wind capacity. [126319]

Ms Hewitt: Invitations to a press briefing were issued to media representatives in advance of the announcement on the expansion of offshore wind capacity on 14 July. No other briefing material was released in advance of the announcement.

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether wind farms built on unpopulated islands and islands with populations of less than 1,000 people are entitled to support under the offshore wind capital grants programme. [126779]

1 Sept 2003 : Column 709W

Mr. Timms: Wind farms built on islands would not be entitled to support under the offshore wind capital grants programme, as such wind farms are considered onshore rather than offshore.

Onshore wind farms are not eligible for capital grants, since onshore wind is close to becoming commercially competitive. However, onshore wind farms (wherever situated) would be eligible for support under the Renewables Obligations.

LEADER OF THE HOUSE

EU Institutions (Visits)

Mr. Allen: To ask the Leader of the House pursuant to his answer of 15 July 2003, ref 124996, how many visits were made by hon. Members to each venue. [126909]

Mr. Hain: The number of visits made by hon. Members to each location in 2002–03 were as follows:

LocationVisits
Ankara3
Athens5
Berlin15
Brussels85
Bucharest4
Budapest1
Copenhagen2
Dublin10
Helsinki1
Lisbon2
Madrid14
Nicosia5
Paris15
Prague9
Riga1
Rome10
Sofia2
Stockholm6
Strasbourg14
The Hague9
Valetta1
Vienna1
Warsaw3
Total visits made218

1 Sept 2003 : Column 710W

Pre-legislative Scrutiny

Mr. Allen: To ask the Leader of the House which departmental select committee chairmen he has met to discuss pre-legislation scrutiny by their committees. [126869]

Mr. Hain: I have not met any departmental select committee chairmen to discuss pre-legislative scrutiny by their committees and have no plans to do so.

I have met the Chairman of the Liaison Committee to discuss pre-legislative scrutiny, among other matters, and I hope to meet the members of the Liaison Committee in the autumn. The Government seek to facilitate pre-legislative scrutiny as far as is possible and has placed great emphasis on producing more bills in draft. However, the way in which committees perform their core duties is a matter for Parliament, not Government.

Mr. Allen: To ask the Leader of the House pursuant to his answer of 15 July, ref 124976, if he will list the ways in which each of the Bills was scrutinised; and if he will make a statement. [126910]

Mr. Hain: The following information requested is as follows: nine draft bills were laid before Parliament this Session. The table indicates in each case the Committee which has undertaken, or will undertake, pre-legislative scrutiny.

Draft BillPre-legislative scrutiny by
Electricity (Trading and Transmission)Trade and Industry Committee
CorruptionJoint Committee on the draft Corruption Bill
HousingCommittee on the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister
Public Audit (Wales)Welsh Affairs Committee (and the National Assembly for Wales)
Civil ContingenciesJoint Committee on the draft Civil Contingencies Bill
Nuclear Sites and Radioactive SubstancesTrade and Industry Committee
Mental IncapacityJoint Committee on the draft Mental Incapacity Bill
Gender RecognitionJoint Committee on Human Rights
Gambling (part 1)Joint Committee on the draft Gambling Bill

Special Advisers

Mr. Flight: To ask the Leader of the House how many (a) special advisers, (b) press officers, (c) civil servants, (d) advisers to civil servants and (e) permanent staff were working for the Leader of the House in each year since 1996. [126470]

Mr. Hain: The information requested, where available, is as follows and includes staff working in both the Office of the Leader and Deputy Leader:

FromCivil servantsSpecial advisersPress officers
May 199761
June 199771
March 199882
November 1999102
August 20001121
November 20021222

The post of Deputy Leader of the House of Commons was created in July 1999.


The Press Officers working for the Leader and Deputy Leader are employed by the Cabinet Office.

1 Sept 2003 : Column 711W

All the civil servants working in the offices of the Leader and Deputy Leader have permanent status, though all except one are on loan from other Departments.

Written Ministerial Statements

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Leader of the House how many written ministerial statements have been made by his Office since 29 October 2002. [126603]

Mr. Hain: Two.

TRANSPORT

Listed Buildings

Mr. Norman: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) Grade I, (b) Grade II* and (c) Grade II buildings have been identified for demolition as a result of his response to the 11 multi modal studies announced on 9 July; and where they are located. [126695]

Mr. Jamieson: There are no Grade I or Grade II* listed buildings identified for demolition due to road schemes that entered the Targeted Programme of Improvements on 9 July. The Grade II Burgess Hill Farmhouse and Barn are on the proposed route of the A21 dualling between Tonbridge and Pembury. No decision has been taken on whether to demolish or relocate these buildings.

London Underground

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much London Underground Ltd. spent on (a) advertising and (b) public relations in each of the last six years. [126554]

Mr. McNulty: Due to organisational changes in 1999 (London Transport becoming part of Transport for London, and restructuring of London Underground to reflect "shadowing running" in anticipation of the Public Private Partnership), it is only possible to provide comparable figures over the last three years.

Advertising & Customer Information (£ million)Public Relations(£ million)
2002–038.41.3
2001–027.81.6
2000–018.41.1

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many prosecutions of London Underground Ltd. there were in each of the last six years for breaches of health and safety regulations. [126555]

Mr. McNulty: This information is freely available on Health and Safety Executive's Website, www.hse.gov.uk. The number of prosecutions against London Underground for health and safety breaches over the last six years is as follows:

1 Sept 2003 : Column 712W

Number
19960
19980
19991
20000
20013
20020

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) at what frequency each London Underground station was cleaned on 14 July; [126557]

Mr. McNulty: The information is not available in the format requested. LU has strict guidelines about station and train cleanliness and they form a key part of the PPP contracts. London Underground are working very closely with their Infraco partners to achieve improvements. The PPP contracts sets benchmarks for performance and Infracos have incentives to achieve these or suffer financial penalties for failure.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many London Underground (a) staff and (b) contractors were employed to clean (i) stations and (ii) trains on 14 July. [126626]

Mr. McNulty: Station and train cleanliness are a key element of the PPP contracts. Therefore, the responsibility for employing staff to clean trains and stations is the responsibility of each of LU's Infraco partners. The number of cleaners employed is a matter for them.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many London Underground train carriages were available for use on each underground line on 14 July. [126627]

Mr. McNulty: The number of train carriages available for service on each Underground line on 14 July, during the evening peak (18.00) was as follows:

LineCarriages in service
Bakerloo210
Central520
Victoria288
Waterloo & City16
Jubilee246
Northern522
Piccadilly360
Metropolitan336
Circle72
Hammersmith & City84
East London24
District456
Total LU3,134

1 Sept 2003 : Column 713W

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport on how many miles of track London Underground was operating passenger services on 14 July broken down by line. [126629]

Mr. McNulty: The following table, shows miles of track by line. The figures exclude depots and sidings, but include National Rail tracks over which LU operates passenger services:

LineMiles
Bakerloo29.7
Central91.3
Victoria27.7
Waterloo & City2.8
Jubilee48.4
Northern75.5
Piccadilly68.0
Metropolitan/Hammersmith & City106.6
East London9.0
District78.9
Total538.0

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what the average temperature during the summer period was on each of the London Underground lines in 2002; [126630]

Mr. McNulty: London Underground does not hold such data in the format requested.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many London Underground stations were covered by CCTV systems on 14 July. [126631]

Mr. McNulty: London Underground, for reasons of security, do not publicly disclose the number of stations with CCTV coverage. They can confirm that 96 per cent. of stations possess CCTV facilities. Under the PPP, improving security of customers and staff is a key priority and LU and their partners are committed to delivering these improvements.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much litter was collected on each underground line in the last 12 months. [126632]

Mr. McNulty: Data are not available in the format requested. However, LU estimates that approximately 15 tonnes of litter is removed from trains and stations every day.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) lowest and (b) highest salary was for London Underground (i) station staff, (ii) drivers and (iii) board members on 14 July 2003. [126641]

Mr. McNulty: The information requested is set out in the following table:

1 Sept 2003 : Column 714W

£

Lowest SalaryHighest Salary
Station staff (From Customer Service Assistant to Station Supervisor)18,93234,044
Train Operators (drivers)(8)31,27431,274
London Underground Board Members98,291154,500

(8) Train operators are paid at a flat rate


Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many London Underground stations were fully accessible to people with disabilities on 14 July. [126642]

Mr. McNulty: There were currently 39 stations served by London Underground on 14 July with step-free access to their platforms. Train Operating Companies manage nine of these stations.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) lowest and (b) highest (i) single and (ii) return fares were on the London Underground on 14 July. [126643]

Mr. McNulty: Setting of Underground fares has been an operational responsibility for Transport for London and the Mayor of London since the summer of 2000. The cheapest adult tickets on London Underground are (i) 1.00 single and (ii) 2.00 return. The most expensive adult tickets they sell are (i) £3.70 single and (ii) £7.40 return.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) lowest priced and (b) highest priced (i) monthly and (ii) annual season ticket was on the London Underground on 14 July. [126644]

Mr. McNulty: Setting of Underground fares has been an operational responsibility for Transport for London and the Mayor of London since the summer of 2000. The cheapest adult season tickets on London Underground are (i) 35 monthly and (ii) 364 annual. The most expensive adult season tickets they sell are (i) £142.90 monthly and (ii) £1,488 annual. The cheapest monthly and annual season tickets cover only one Travelcard Zone (a choice of zones 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 but not 1). The most expensive monthly and annual season tickets cover all Zones (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6).

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) earliest and (b) latest train running times were on each London Underground line on 14 July. [126645]

Mr. McNulty: The earliest and latest running times from Monday to Friday were as follows:

Earliest trainLatest train
Bakerloo05.3800.50
Central05.1201.09
Circle05.1201.09
District04.5601.28
East London05.2401.13
Hammersmith and City04.4000.59
Jubilee05.1201.13
Metropolitan05.2201.30
Northern05.1301.12
Piccadilly05.1001.16
Victoria05.2001.02
Waterloo and City06.1521.52

1 Sept 2003 : Column 715W

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the average waiting time at London Underground ticket offices was in the four weeks before 14 July. [126646]

Mr. McNulty: According to London Underground's latest figures, (four weeks to 21 June) the average waiting time at ticket offices was 66.4 seconds. This is the lowest average waiting time attained for four years.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many acts of aggression against staff there were on each London Underground line in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [126647]

Mr. McNulty: Following a major programme aimed at improving staff protection, physical assaults fell by 4 per cent. in 2002–03, the first time in many years. The figures requested are provided as follows.

LineInstances of aggression
Bakerloo46
Central123
District Line189
East London10
Jubilee148
Circle and Hammersmith14
Metropolitan233
Northern183
Piccadilly163
Victoria64
Total1,173

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much revenue was raised through London Underground fares in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [126648]

Mr. McNulty: For 2002–03, total fares that London Underground earned for carrying passengers on its network was 1,108.5 million.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many London Underground employees there were on 14 July, broken down by (a) train drivers, (b) station staff, (c) HQ staff and (d) other categories of staff. [126649]

Mr. McNulty: The following data include permanent staff and those on fixed term contracts but exclude agency staff:

Number
Train operators (drivers)3,189
Station staff6,164
HQ staff (Central Directorates)1,668
Other categories of staff(9)2,045
Total13,066

(9) Personnel supporting train operators and station staff in the Trains and Stations Directorates.


Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) train cancellations and (b) delays of more than 10 minutes to London Underground train services there were on each line in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [126650]

Mr. McNulty: The following data cover July 2002– June 2003.

1 Sept 2003 : Column 716W

LineDelays greater than 15 minutesPeak cancellations
Bakerloo342926
Central2889,435
Victoria149572
Waterloo and City79254
Jubilee247600
Northern2591,309
Piccadilly4092,546
Metropolitan5541,260
Circle and Hammersmith2891,743
East London90107
District5671,421
Total3,27320,173

Notes:

1. Cancellation figures given are for M-F peaks (09:00 and 18:00 'snapshots').

2. London Underground's key performance indicator for delays is based on 15 minutes


Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the level of fare evasion was on the London Underground in the last 12 months for which figures are available; and how many people were prosecuted for fare evasion on each line during that period. [126651]

Mr. McNulty: In the 12 months to November 2002, 3.54 per cent. of passengers were unable to produce a ticket, or carried an incorrect ticket. Between 1 July 2002–1 July 2003, LU submitted 2,042 prosecutions for fare evasion. LU carries out regular ticket irregularity surveys, and not all instances of passengers using incorrect tickets are an attempt to avoid paying the correct fare.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the average number of passengers carried at peak times on each London Underground line was during the last 12 months for which figures are available. [126652]

Mr. McNulty: The following figures show the average number of passengers travelling in peak times during a typical week in 2002:

7am-10am4pm-7pm
Bakerloo83.37091.470
Central170,229184.227
District178,250169,945
East London10,73710,207
Jubilee126,286125,316
Hammersmith and City44,570395
Metropolitan73.03667,385
Northern202,105192,946
Piccadilly134,526156,320
Victoria149,728157,418
Circle58,48963,843
Waterloo and City17,80614,577


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