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25 Feb 2003 : Column 388W—continued

Work Placements

Mr. Allen: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many university students her Department and associated agencies has supported or sponsored with a work placement in the last year; what her policy is on work placements; what plans she has to develop such schemes; and what her policy is on paying their university fees. [98549]

Clare Short: My Department has extensive contacts with UK Universities and supports work placements for students on an ad hoc basis.

DFID is also a corporate sponsor of the Windsor Fellowship. The Windsor Fellowship is a charity whose aim is to identify high achievers from Black and Asian communities and to offer them a development programme. We have provided six Fellows with eight-week placements. DFID also provides up to four placements a year under the Cabinet Office Summer Development Programme for potential applicants to the fast stream from within the ethnic minorities. Attachments last between six to eight weeks.

It is not our practice to pay university fees of those whose placements we sponsor.

We do not operate a formal scheme for the placement of university students and have no plans to do so.

HOUSE OF COMMONS COMMISSION

E-mails

Mr. Liddell-Grainger: To ask the hon. Member for Roxburgh and Berwickshire, representing the House of Commons Commission what type of software is used to filter e-mails in the House. [98279]

Sir Archy Kirkwood: A commercially available software package is used to detect and block incoming messages containing viruses and to filter incoming e-mails containing inappropriate material.

Internet Monitoring

Mr Liddell-Grainger: To ask the hon. Member for Roxburgh and Berwickshire, representing the House of Commons Commission whether use of the internet within the parliamentary estate is monitored. [98278]

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Sir Archy Kirkwood: The Parliamentary Communications Directorate monitors the amount and type of internet traffic in order to manage the network and to inform planning decisions. For staff of the House of Commons, the House Authorities reserve the right to monitor individual use of the internet upon a written request from a departmental establishments officer.

HOME DEPARTMENT

Criminal Records Checks

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people applying for positions within residential care and nursing homes are awaiting clearance from the Criminal Records Bureau in (a) the East Riding of Yorkshire, (b) Hull and (c) England.[Transferred] [97721]

Hilary Benn: Data on outstanding applications for specific job types or the areas requested are not available because there are no IT procedures at present to extract this data from the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) database. This functionality is expected to be available during subsequent system releases.

Disclosures are currently taking an average of five weeks to complete. Many of the outstanding applications at any time will be the subject of requests to applicants or Registered bodies for future information. There are 62,327 cases over three weeks old (less than two weeks output), plus a further 82,204 such cases awaiting information from customers.

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether civil offences are recorded in disclosures issued as a result of criminal records bureaux checks. [97675]

Hilary Benn: At present, the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) is issuing Standard and Enhanced Disclosures. These show spent and unspent convictions, cautions, reprimands and warnings recorded on the Police National Computer. In appropriate cases, the CRB searches a list kept by the Department for Education and Skills of people who are considered unsuitable to work with children. An Enhanced Disclosure would also include other information held in local police records which, in the chief officer's opinion, is relevant to the matter in hand and ought to be included in the Disclosure. It is possible that a Disclosure might include information about a civil offence as a result of such other enquiries.

Anti-trafficking Budgets

Mrs. Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much the budgets of the (a) police, (b) Customs and (c) intelligence services were to combat (i) drug, (ii) firearm and (iii) people trafficking in (A) 2001, (B) 2002 and (C) 2003. [96907]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: The information is as follows:


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£

2001/022002/032003/04
(i). drugs trafficking5. 9m6. 6m7. 7m
(iii). people smuggling0.6m0.5m0.6m

Anti-war Protest

Dr. Julian Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what mechanisms he will use to ensure that the numbers of anti-Gulf War protesters marching to Hyde Park on 15 February 2003 are accurately counted. [97956]

Mr. Denham [holding answer 24 February 2003]: The Government do not calculate the number of people participating in marches and demonstrations. The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS), as well as other police forces, use a range of techniques for estimating the numbers involved.

British Detainees (Switzerland)

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information he has received from Swiss authorities regarding two Britons detained in Switzerland last year on suspicion of terrorist activities at the Gösgen nuclear power station in Switzerland. [98852]

Mr. Blunkett: Due to the confidential nature of cases received in respect of Mutual Legal Assistance, I can neither confirm nor deny the existence of letters of request. In any event, we would discuss operational cases where criminal investigations may be on-going.

Correspondence

Mr. Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he intends to reply to the letter to him dated 4 November from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Ms Mansoureli Bozorovia. [97086]

Mr. Blunkett: I wrote to my right hon .Friend on 24 February 2003.

Crime (Humberside)

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people arrested in (a) Haltemprice and Howden, (b) the East Riding of Yorkshire and (c) the Humberside Police Authority area tested positive for category A or B drugs in each quarter since 1997. [97723]

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Mr. Bob Ainsworth: At present arrestees throughout England and Wales are not routinely tested for drugs, so it is not possible to provide the level of detail requested.

However, the New English and Welsh Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (NEW-ADAM) research programme, which involves interviewing and drug testing those arrested by the police at 16 sites throughout England and Wales, does provide some information. Analysis of the data from the first eight sites in the survey, collected during 1999–2000, shows that of those arrestees that provided a urine sample, 65 per cent. tested positive for one or more illegal drugs, while 30 per cent. tested positive for two or more such substance. Indeed, 29 per cent. tested positive for opiates (including heroin) and/or cocaine (including crack).

Drug test results are also available from three drug-testing pilot sites. The Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000 gave the police power to drug test arrestees once they are charged with a "trigger offence" (these include property crime, robbery and specified

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Class A drug offences). The proportion of police tests, collected during July 2001 to February 2002, where results were positive for cocaine and/or heroin were: Hackney, 63 per cent.; Nottingham, 58 per cent.; Stafford and Cannock, 47 per cent.

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions were recorded in each year since 1997 in the Humberside police authority areas for (i) carrying a loaded firearm in a public place, (ii) acquiring a firearm under the age of 17, (iii) being a person under 14 possessing an air weapon or ammunition, (iv) being a person under 14 possessing an air weapon in a public place, (v) supplying an air weapon to a person under 14 and (vi) making improper use of an air weapon. [97722]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: The information contained in the table gives the number of defendants proceeded against and convicted of the various firearms offences requested, in the Humberside police force area, 1997 to 2001.

Statistics for 2002 will be published in the autumn.

Number of defendants(1) proceeded against at magistrates courts and convicted at all courts(2) for certain firearms offences,
Humberside, 1997 to 2001

199719981999
OffencedescriptionStatuteProceeded againstConvictedProceeded againstConvictedProceeded againstConvicted
(See footnote(3) for definition of Firearm Groups)
(i) Carrying a loaded firearm in a public place
Carrying loaded firearm in public place etc. (Group 1)Firearms Act 1968 sec. 19 amended by the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 section 157 sch. 8 part III1121
Carrying loaded firearm in public place etc. (Group II)Ibid.111
Carrying loaded firearm in public place etc. (Group III)Ibid.569932
Total78121033
(ii) Acquiring a firearm under the age of 17
Person under 17 acquiring firearm (Group 1)Firearms Act 1968 section 22(1)
Person under 17 acquiring firearm (Group II)Ibid.
Person under 17 acquiring firearm (Group III)Ibid.
Total
(iii) Person under 14 having with him an air weapon or ammunition therefore, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968 section 22(4)
(iv) Person under 17 having with him an air weapon in a public place, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968 section 22(5)1111
(v) Supplying air weapon to person under 14, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968, section 24(4)11
(vi) Person under 14 making improper use of air weapon when under supervision, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968 Section 23(1)(a)


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20002001
Offence descriptionStatuteProceeded againstConvictedProceeded againstConvicted
(See footnote(3) for definition of Firearm Groups)
(i) Carrying a loaded firearm in a public place
Carrying loaded firearm in public place etc. (Group 1)Firearms Act 1968 sec. 19 amended by the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 section 157 sch. 8 part III11
Carrying loaded firearm in public place etc. (group II)Ibid.
Carrying loaded firearm in public place etc. (Group III)Ibid.9743
Total10843
(ii) Acquiring a firearm under the age of 17
Person under 17 acquiring firearm (Group 1)Firearms Act 1968 section 22(1)
Person under 17 acquiring firearm (Group II)Ibid.—-
Person under 17 acquiring firearm (Group III)Ibid.22
Total
(iii) Person under 14 having with him an air weapon or a ammunition therefore, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968 section 22(4)
(iv) Person under 17 having with him an air weapon in a public place, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968 section 22(5)11
(v) Supplying air weapon to person under 14, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968, section 24(4)11
(vi) Person under 14 making improper use of air weapon when under supervision, (Group III)Firearms Act 1968 section 23(1)(a)

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.

(2) Due to the time lag between committal for trial and appearance at the Crown Court, it is possible for number convicted to exceed those proceeded against in a given year.

(3) For the purposes of recording offences. Firearms are divided into three groups as follows:

Group 1—All firearms etc. other than those described in Group II and III.

Group II—Shot guns as defined in section 1(3)(a) of the Act.

Group III—Air weapons as defined in section 1(3)(b) of the Act.


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