Select Committee on International Development Minutes of Evidence


Memorandum submitted by the World Food Programme

THE WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME

  The World Food Programme (WFP) is the United Nations' front-line agency in the fight against global hunger. Last year WFP fed more than 83 million people in 83 countries including most of the world's refugees and internally displaced people. It moved 3.7 million metric tons of essential food.

    —  WFP reacts in as little as 48 hours to major disasters in Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, Kosovo, Angola and East Timor.

    —  WFP delivers food aid only in emergencies and in targeted projects like food for work, maternal and child health and school feeding. We do not interfere with the private sector or discourage poor people from growing their own food.

    —  Over the past five years, WFP has closed offices in 26 countries that no longer need food assistance.

    —  WFP is decentralizing, moving our staff and resources closer to the people we serve.

    —  WFP targets its resources to the people and places where they will have the greatest impact. It does this through mapping vulnerability to hunger and by setting up rapid response teams and strategic food stocks for emergencies.

HOW IS WFP FUNDED?

    —  WFP is voluntarily funded, receiving no "assessed contributions" from members of the United Nations. Each donor chooses to support WFP based on its efficiency and effectiveness.

    —  Contributions to WFP may be completely in cash, or a combination of cash and goods and/or services (e.g. food, transport, equipment, consultants).

    —  Since WFP has no assured funding base, all contributions must meet `full cost recovery'. That means that each donor covers the cost of moving, managing and monitoring their donationation. A typical donation includes the cost of:

      —  food

      —  external transport

      —  inland transport, storage and handling

      —  a share of the direct costs incurred at the field level to implement the project, and

      —  a share of the indirect costs of regional and headquarters support to operations.

    —  WFP has the largest budget of any UN agency but the smallest staff and lowest percentage spent on administration. WFP's overhead is just 7.8 per cent of expenditure. WFP's budget is performance-based: overhead depends on the amount of food moved to feed the hungry.

    —  Donors to WFP may choose to give:

      —  a multilateral contribution (i.e. the donor chooses only whether its contribution be used for development, emergency or protracted relief operations) or

    —  a directed multilateral contribution (i.e. the donor chooses which project to support).

WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME: STOCK IN AFGHAN WAREHOUSES AND RELEASES 11-30 SEPTEMBER 2001*

LocationOpening Stock as of 11 Sep 2001 (MT) Total Released 11-30 Sep 2001 (MT) Opening Stock as of 1 Oct 2001 (MT) Implementing Partners
Kabul6,0443,939 2,966ACTED, UNHCR,COAR, GRSP, KNF, HAND, WRC, WOMEN BAKERY, ESRA, ACRU, CARE, HRRSO, ACF, ADEA, PDA,WHO
Mazar 822 987 110Habitat, SHA, SPR, CHA, MSF, MEG, WFP Bakeries
Andkhoi 302 536 0CHA, MEG
Kandahar1,603 133 1,640IP's to be advised
Faizabad 494 443 221NAC, CS, CONCER
Herat3,9565,435 798DACAAR, IAM, CHA, Afg. AID, OI, HRS, AREA
Jalalabad 800 0 800N/A
Panjshir 936 936 439ACF, ACTED
Total in Afghanistan14,957 12,4086,974  
*Note to the table:          


  1.  The table shows opening stocks of 11 September and subsequent releases from WFP warehouses. The last column of the right shows NGOs who received food during the month from each warehouse.

  2.  Despatches from external hubs (logistics hubs outside of Afghanistan) into Afghanistan recommenced on 25 September and replenished stocks in the Kabul, Herat, Andkhoi and Kandahar warehouses.

  3.  In some locations, WFP borrowed food from NGO partners' stock, in order to continue distribution throughout the month e.g. Mazar and Faizabad.

World Food Programme

21 November 2001


 
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Prepared 20 December 2001