Select Committee on Health Memoranda


Table 4.6.1

UNIT COSTS (£s) OF SELECTED PERSONAL SOCIAL SERVICES ENGLAND 1996-97 TO 2000-01
Unit Cost 1996-971997-98 1998-991999-2000 1999-2000 (est)2000-01


Excluding overheads and capital charges Including overheads
and capital charges
Gross expenditure per week on supporting residents aged 65 and over in nursing homes (1), (2), (3) Cash terms
Real terms (10)
255
283
286
308
291
305
319
326
341
349
368
368
Gross expenditure per week on supporting residents aged 65 and over in local authority residential homes (1), (2), (3), (4) Cash terms
Real terms (10)
301
334
317
341
330
346
356
363
382
392
426
426
Gross expenditure per week on supporting residents aged 65 and over in independent residential homes (1), (2), (3), (4) Cash terms
Real terms (10)
234
259
217
233
240
251
254
260
271
278
279
279
Gross expenditure per hour of home care for all clients aged 18 or over (1), (5) Cash terms
Real terms (10)
8.6
9.6
8.8
9.5
9.4
9.9
10.0
10.2
11.2
11.5
11.4
11.4
Gross expenditure per week per child looked after by foster parents (1), (6), (7) Cash terms
Real terms (10)
175
194
190
205
200
210
221
226
230
236
270
270
Gross expenditure per week per child looked after in local authority maintained children's homes (1), (8), (9) Cash terms
Real terms (10)
1,258
1,395
1,325
1,426
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..


  Key: .. = not available

  (1)  For 2000-01 total costs (ie total gross current expenditure + capital costs) as reported on form PSS EX1 are used to calculate unit costs. Expenditure includes a full share of Social Services Management and Support Services (SSMSS) costs. For years prior to 2000-01 gross current expenditure as reported on form RO3 has been to calculate unit costs. SSMSS costs are not included in the expenditure if they have been separately identified.

  (2)  For 2000-01 these unit costs have been calculated by taking total costs throughout the year for residential and nursing homes as appropriate and dividing it by the number of weeks older people were supported in such homes during the year. Nursing homes include nursing places in dual registered homes; residential homes include residential places in dual registered homes. A supported resident is one who is supported wholly or in part by the local authority. Residents in local authority homes who are assessed to pay the full costs and residents in other homes whose fees are paid in part or through income support have been included.

  (3)  For years prior to 2000-01 these unit costs have been calculated by taking gross current expenditure throughout the year on residential and nursing homes as appropriate and dividing it by the average number of supported residents in such homes reported at 31 March in consecutive years. Nursing homes include nursing places in dual registered homes; residential homes includes residential places in dual registered homes. A supported resident is one who is supported wholly or in part by the local authority. Residents in local authority homes who are assessed to pay the full costs and residents in other homes whose fees are paid in part or through income support are not included.

  (4)  From 1998-99 the definition of local authority care as reported on form RO3 has changed to exclude expenditure on people placed in the home of another local authority. This expenditure is now included in the independent sector expenditure.

  (5)  This unit cost is calculated by taking gross current expenditure throughout the year on home care services and dividing it by activity data collected during a sample week in the Autumn.

  (6)  For 2000-01 this unit cost has been calculated by taking total costs throughout the year and dividing by the number of days children looked after spent in foster placements including respite and short term placements. For years prior to 2000-01 the unit cost has been calculated by taking gross current expenditure throughout the year on foster placements and dividing it by the average number of children looked after placed in foster placements at 31 March in consecutive years. Children in respite and short term placements have not been included.

  (7)  For 1998-99 and 1999-2000 expenditure on foster placements also includes expenditure on lodgings, living independently, residential employment, children placed with parents or placed for adoption.

  (8)  This unit cost has been calculated by taking gross current expenditure throughout the year on LA maintained children's homes and dividing it by the average number of children looked after placed in LA maintained children's homes at 31 March in consecutive years.

  (9)  From 1998-99 expenditure on LA maintained children's homes is no longer separately identified.

  (10)  Deflated using the GDP deflator at 2000-01 prices.







4.   Personal Social Services Resources and Activity

    4.7  Could the Department provide a table showing for each authority the latest information on the proportion of social services for adults which are purchased from the independent sector rather than being provided directly? Could the Department supply a commentary on these figures? [5.4]

  1.  Table 4.7.1 shows for each authority the percentage contribution of the independent sector in respect of two main elements of community-based social services for adults (contact hours of home help/care and the percentage of local authority supported residents in independent sector residential care homes). Councils are continuing to make increased use of the independent sector.

  2.  For England as a whole, the independent sector provided 60 per cent of the total contact hours of home help/care in 2001, as compared with 56 per cent in 2000 and 2 per cent in 1992, prior to the introduction of the Community Care Reforms of 1993. Use of the independent sector varies considerably between authorities and between services within authorities. 29 per cent of authorities have less than 50 per cent of their home help/care services provided by the independent sector and four authorities have all their provision from the independent sector. The variations in the use of the independent sector may reflect historical patterns of provision, local needs and local political priorities.

  3.  Local authorities place and financially support significant numbers of clients in independent sector residential care homes—75 per cent of all local authority supported residents in residential care (excluding unstaffed homes). This represents a slight increase on the 2000 figure of 73 per cent. Over the last few years a substantial number of authorities have transferred some of their homes to independent ownership. There is some variation in the use of the independent sector. Although there are no Local Authorities where all supported residents completely are in independent sector homes, just 5 per cent of councils have less than 50 per cent of their supported residents in independent sector homes.

  4.  Table 4.7.2 shows for supported residents how those in the independent sector are split between private and voluntary homes. Overall, 15 per cent of supported residents in England are in voluntary homes and 60 per cent in private homes, though the figures for some authorities show a markedly different pattern.

  5.  Information on the total amount spent in the independent sector is not collected centrally.


 
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Prepared 17 February 2003