Select Committee on European Scrutiny Thirtieth Report



CONCLUSION

  1. Great improvements have been made to the House's system of European scrutiny over the years, especially in 1998, but considerable further improvement is necessary if the Commons is to play the role in respect of the EU which the Government envisages, and especially if it is to help to reconnect citizens and EU institutions. Such improvement can also be justified in purely UK terms, given that a large proportion of new legislation in the UK results from EU legislation, and, as the Leader of the House has put it, 'good scrutiny makes for good Government'.[115]
  2. Many of the problems we discuss in this Report are of course longstanding ones, much discussed in previous Reports, and change in most areas is likely to be incremental. Nevertheless, we believe our proposals here, together with the Government's commitment to improve the scrutiny system and the proposals in our report on Democracy and accountability in the EU and the role of national parliaments, provide a rare opportunity for significant improvements in the effectiveness with which the House handles EU matters and an increase in the influence it can exert in such matters.

 


115   Memorandum, HC 440, 2001-02, paragraph 2. Back

 
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