Previous Section Index Home Page


7 Nov 2002 : Column 729W—continued

Higher Education

Mr. Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what the annual real terms funding per student in higher education has been in each year since 1997; [78383]

Margaret Hodge [holding reply 31 October 2002]: I will write to the hon. Member and place a copy of my reply in the Library.

7 Nov 2002 : Column 730W

Mr. Boswell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, when he will publish his annual grant letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England. [80278]

Margaret Hodge: The grant letter to the Higher Education Funding Council for England will be published in due course.

Mr. Boswell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, if he will make a statement on the overall financial position of the higher education sector in each of the last three years; and how many institutions were in (a) surplus and (b) deficit in each of those years. [80317]

Margaret Hodge: The table shows the overall financial position of the publicly funded higher education sector in England and the number of institutions with deficits in the last three years for which information is available.

1998–991999–20002000–01
Total income #m9,91510,40211,069
Operating surplus #m17312544
Number of HEIs in deficit285248

In 2000–01, there were 130 higher education institutions funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.


Mr. Boswell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, what research he collates on the correlation between higher education expenditure and changes in Gross Domestic Product. [80337]

Margaret Hodge: Data for OECD countries shows a positive correlation between the proportion of GDP spent on higher education institutions and levels of Gross Domestic Product. It is difficult to isolate the impact of higher education on growth due to the many other things which determine economic growth. Evidence suggests that higher education is more important for growth in developed countries than other levels of education. The returns from higher education enjoyed by individuals are high. For example, graduates earn around 64 per cent. more than non-graduates. Participation in higher education generates wider social benefits such as improved health and reduced crime. Research also suggests that the spill-over effects of higher education R&D on productivity are extremely high.

Ann Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, if he will calculate the (a) amount spent per pupil on primary and secondary education by Cheshire County Council and (b) average amount spent per pupil on primary and secondary education by local authorities in England in the last financial year for which figures are available; what assessment he has made of the effect on educational provision in Cheshire if the average sum were to be spent; and if he will make a statement. [80005]

Mr. Miliband: The requested information is as follows:

(a) Net Current Expenditure per pupil in Cheshire
Primary#2310
Secondary#2920
Both#2580 (b) Net Current Expenditure per pupil in England
Primary#2440
Secondary#3060
Both#2710

All figures in cash terms and rounded to the nearest #10.

The data has been taken from Cheshire Education Authority's section 52 Outturn statement for the 2000–01 financial year. Variations in spending per pupil between authorities reflect higher area costs and greater incidence of deprivation in some areas. The Government will be announcing later this year the outcome of its review of formula funding for local authorities.


7 Nov 2002 : Column 731W

Ann Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how many representations he has received from residents of (a) Cheshire and (b) Congleton constituency registering their response to his Department's review of revenue grant distribution; when he expects to announce his decision following his Department's consultation; and if he will make a statement. [80004]

Mr. Miliband: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Minister for Local Government on 6 November.

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how many students were attending a full-time degree level course or its equivalent in each year since 1990, broken down by local education authority. [79252]

Margaret Hodge [holding answer 4 November 2002]: I will write to my right hon. friend when the information is available and will place a copy of my reply in the Library.

Mr. Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, if he will consult (a) students and (b) parents of students living in Cambridgeshire on the findings of the review of higher education. [79571]

Mr. Caton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, what plans the Government has to consult student organizations on the outcome of the review of higher education. [79449]

Margaret Hodge: We have announced our intention to publish in January a strategy document setting out our vision for the development and reform of higher education, including the outcome of the review of student support. Once the document is published there will be opportunity for interested parties to respond.

Schools (Cambridgeshire)

Mr. Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, if he will ensure that no schools in Cambridgeshire have a cash budget cut in the next financial year. [79567]

Mr. Miliband: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Castle Point (Bob Spink) on 6 November 2002.

7 Nov 2002 : Column 732W

Mr. Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how many representations his Department has received in connection with the funding of (a) schools and (b) school pupils in Cambridgeshire over the last year. [79570]

Mr. Miliband: My right hon. Friend has received 25 letters in connection with the funding of schools in Cambridgeshire over the last year. In addition a number of Cambridgeshire residents responded to the consultation on Local Government Funding reform which closed on 30th September: to identify precisely these letters from amongst the very large numbers of responses to the consultation would incur disproportionate cost.

Mr. Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how many schools in Cambridgeshire had a cash budget cut in this financial year. [79568]

Mr. Miliband: In Cambridgeshire Local Education Authority 46 schools had a fall in their cash budget share in 2002–03, but of these only 7 also had a fall in their cash budget share per pupil. Changes in pupil numbers are the principal reason for changes in budget share from year to year. 199 schools had a rise in their cash budget share, but of these 12 had a fall in their cash budget share per pupil: this was largely in cases where small primary schools had rising rolls and therefore received less of the extra funding that goes to the smallest schools under the authority's formula.

The information is taken from data published in the LEA's section 52 budget statements for 2001–02 and 2002–03.

Student Finance

Dr. Palmer: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) when the Government will publish its review of student funding; [78522]

Margaret Hodge: The outcome of the student finance review will form part of the strategy document setting out our 10-year vision for the development and reform of higher education. The document will be published in the next few months; it would not be right to pre-empt it here by saying what is or is not planned.

School Funding

Ms Drown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, what the average funding per pupil is in (a) Swindon and (b) England in 2002–03 [79960]

Mr. Miliband: In 2002–03 Swindon's average funding per pupil is #3,170 compared with the average in England of #3,610.


Figures in cash terms for pupils aged 4–19—rounded to the nearest #10. The figures include the Education SSA plus grants.

7 Nov 2002 : Column 733W

Sir Patrick Cormack: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how much his Department spent in 2001 on each (a) primary and (b) secondary school pupil in (i) Staffordshire and (ii) Hertfordshire. [79849]

Mr. Miliband: The requested information for 2000–01 is as follows:







Source:

The LEA Section 52 Outturn statements relating to the 2000–01 financial year.

All figures in cash terms and rounded to the nearest #10.

Sir Patrick Cormack: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how much additional funding has been provided to secondary schools in (i) Staffordshire and (ii) Hertfordshire in the current financial year. [79850]

Mr. Miliband: Most additional funding for schools is allocated to local education authorities and cannot be disaggregated between different types of schools. The following table shows the additional funding that is specifically allocated for secondary education in Staffordshire and Hertfordshire in 2002–2003. Secondary schools will receive more than this from grants that cover all types of school, but the exact amount will depend on local decisions.

StaffordshireHertfordshire
Grant##
School Standards Grant4,929,6005,975,100
Specialist Schools1,624,6592,023,168
Training Schools155,000
Beacon Schools92,000190,500
Key Stage 3 Strategy1,637,4001,897,685
School Achievement Awards317,560578,020
Vocational GSCEs58,73273,203
Electronic Registration Systems17,200113,810
Total8,677,15111,006,486

Sir Patrick Cormack: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how many representations on the funding of education in Staffordshire his Department has received since June 2001. [79848]

Mr. Miliband: The Department has answered 87 letters on the funding of education in Staffordshire since June 2001, and has received 5 petitions from schools. In addition a number of Staffordshire residents responded to the consultation on Local Government Funding reform which closed on 30 September: to identify precisely these letters from amongst the very large numbers of responses to the consultation would incur disproportionate cost.

Mr. Djanogly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills, how much was spent on each (a) primary and (b) secondary school pupil in (i) 2001–2 and (ii) 2002–3 in (A) Cambridgeshire, (B) Bedfordshire, (C) Hertfordshire, (D) Northamptonshire, (E) Norfolk, (F) Essex, (G) London, (H) Liverpool and (I) Birmingham. [79569]

7 Nov 2002 : Column 734W

Mr Miliband: The following table contains information from 2000–01, the latest year for which data is available:

LEANet Current expenditure per pupil (primary)Net Current expenditure per pupil (secondary)
ACambridgeshire2,2902,930
BBedfordshire2,3202,730
CHertfordshire2,2402,950
DNorthamptonshire2,3302,940
ENorfolk2,3603,150
FEssex2,3903,090
GInner London3,2304,220
GOuter London2,5903,230
GInner and Outer London2,8203,540
HLiverpool2,6703,570
IBirmingham2,6103,360
England2,4403,060

Source:

Section 52 outturn statements relating to the 2000–01 financial year

All figures are in cash terms and rounded to the nearest 10.



Next Section Index Home Page