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Road Accidents

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people were (a) killed and (b) seriously injured in road accidents on all roads in each of the last three years. [71502]

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: The table below provides figures for the number of people (a) killed and (b) seriously injured in road accidents in Great Britain in each of the last three years.

KilledSeriously injured
19993,42339,122
20003,40938,155
2001(5)3,44337,094

(5) Figures for 2001 are provisional.


Road and Bridge Maintenance

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his answer of 15 July 2002, Official Report, column 7W, on road and bridge maintenance, if he will make a statement on the methodology used when calculating the authorities' funding requirements for road and bridge maintenance from 2001 to 2006. [71373]

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: The Local Transport Plan indicative allocations for highway maintenance announced in November 2000 for 2001–02 and 2002–03 were mainly based on the size and condition of the individual authorities' road networks and the number of their bridges requiring strengthening and structural maintenance. Some large maintenance schemes above £5 million in value were approved individually. Authorities were also told that their maintenance allocations for each of the three years 2003–04, 2004–05, and 2005–06 would be at least 75 per cent. of their allocation in 2002–03.

Consultation on the methodology for the full maintenance allocations in the next three years is currently taking place.

Road Improvements

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the major local road improvements, as given in para 6.61, page 65, of the 10-year plan (a) started and (b) completed since July 2000. [71325]

22 Jul 2002 : Column 740W

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: The latest information that we have available from the local authorities shows:

Work on the following major local road schemes has been started and completed since July 2000:


Work on the following major local road schemes has been completed since July 2000:


Work on the following major local road schemes has been started since July 2000:


Road Travel

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many vehicle kilometres were travelled on roads in (a) England and (b) Great Britain in 1996. [71331]

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: The total traffic on the roads in England and Great Britain in 1996 are estimated to be 377.0 and 442.5 billion vehicle kilometres respectively.

Fuel Duty

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement on the level of fuel duty rebate available to community transport services. [71341]

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: Eligible community transport services will receive fuel duty rebate at the same level as applies to other eligible bus services. The current rates are as follows:

Pence per litre

FuelRate of rebate
Ultra low sulphur diesel36.68
Other diesel36.68
Lead replacement petrol34.30
4-star petrol40.16
Unleaded petrol34.30
Ultra low sulphur petrol34.30
Gas(6)9.00

(6) pence per kilo


22 Jul 2002 : Column 741W

Strategic Road Network

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what (a) proportion and (b) length of the strategic road network requires maintenance. [71333]

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: I have asked the Chief Executive of the Highways Agency, Tim Matthews, to write to the hon. Member.

Letter from David York to Mrs. T. May, dated 22 July 2002:


Tim Matthews has been asked by the Transport Minister for the Department for Transport to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question about the proportion and the length of the strategic road network currently requiring maintenance. I am replying since Tim is currently away on Highways Agency business.
The Highways Agency aims to ensure that the network is retained in an optimum, safe condition on a basis that minimises costs over time. To achieve this requires that the proportion of the network requiring maintenance is held between 7% and 8% which equates to between 2,400 and 2,700 lane km.
An assessment of the network was made at the end of March 2002 and this indicated that 7.5% of the network required maintenance.
I hope this is helpful.

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the slight casualty rate was on the strategic road network in each year from 1994 to 2002; and what the annual average was for 1994 to 1998. [71503]

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: The slight casualty rates on the English trunk road network were as follows:

Per 100 million vehicle kilometres
199421.88
199521.01
199622.35
199723.09
199822.28
199921.40
200020.82

The figure for 2001 is not yet available.

The average slight casualty rate for 1994 to 1998 was 22.14 per 100 million vehicle kilometres.

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people were (a) killed and (b) seriously injured on the strategic road network in each of the last three years. [71501]

22 Jul 2002 : Column 742W

Mr. Jamieson [holding answer 19 July 2002]: The number of people killed and seriously injured on the English trunk road network were as follows:

KilledSeriously injured
19986284152
19996644217
20005993950

Note:

Figures for 2001 are not yet available.


Traffic Lights

Richard Ottaway: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a direction under section 30(7) Greater London Authority Act 1999 in relation to the phasing of traffic lights in Greater London. [71366]

Mr. Jamieson: The power in section 30(7) is a power to issue guidance as to the exercise of the general power of the Greater London Authority. It is not a power to direct Transport for London to alter traffic signal phasings.

Drink-Driving

Mrs. Mahon: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many serious injuries have resulted from crashes caused by drivers with (a) more than 80 milligrammes alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood in their bloodstream, (b) between 50 and 80 milligrammes alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood in their bloodstream, (c) between 20 and 50 milligrammes alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood in their bloodstream and (d) a trace of alcohol, but less than 20 milligrammes alcohol per 100 millilitres of blood in their bloodstream, in each of the last 10 years; [70959]

Mr. Jamieson: Estimates of the number of casualties resulting from road accidents in Great Britain where at least one driver (or rider of a two-wheeled motor vehicle) was over the drink-drive limit are given in the table.

Estimates of casualties resulting from accidents involving illegal alcohol levels: Great Britain 1991–2000.

Casualties

YearFatalSeriousSlightTotal
19916603,61013,61017,880
19926603,28012,77016,710
19935402,66011,78014,980
19945402,84011,78015,160
19955403,00012,45016,000
19965803,01013,45017,040
19975502,94013,31016,800
19984602,52012,61015,590
19994602,47013,98016,910
2000(7)5202,53014,98018,030

(7) Provisional data


22 Jul 2002 : Column 743W

National road accident statistics do not identify cases where drivers' blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was below the prescribed limit.

Mrs. Mahon: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many crashes on roads in England and Wales involving multiple fatalities were caused by a driver who was over the drink-drive limit in each of the last 10 years. [70957]

Mr. Jamieson: The number of accidents in England and Wales involving multiple (2 or more) fatalities where a driver was over the drink-drive limit, are shown in the table:

Fatal accidents involving two or more fatalities on roads in England and Wales where a driver was over the limit(8): 1991–2000

EnglandWalesAll
199111011
199215116
199310111
19949211
1995617
199613114
199716117
1998718
1999808
200010010
Total1058113

(8) Driver tested positive or refused to provide a test.



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