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Green Minister

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the work completed by the Green Minister with his Department since the general election. [27506]

Angela Eagle [holding answer 16 January 2002]: The Department has continued to work to contribute towards the Government's sustainable development agenda. As the Green Minister, I have held meetings with lead officials to review progress. The main developments are as follows:









Police Force Expenditure

Mr. Michael Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what police force expenditure has been for each police authority (a) in total and (b) per head of population in each year since 1989. [22981]

Mr. Denham: A table showing the information for England and Wales has been placed in the Library. The figures are taken from the Chartered Institute of

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Public Finance and Accountancy Police Statistics. Actual expenditure is used for years to 1999–2000. Latest available data for 2000–01 and 2001–02 are estimates.

Deportation

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the Government's policy is in relation to deciding which airline should be used for a deportation; and if he will make a statement. [27845]

Angela Eagle [holding answer 16 January 2002]: The powers relating to the removal of persons subject to immigration control are contained in schedule 2 to the Immigration Act 1971 (paragraphs 8–15).

Where the cost of removal falls to be met by the company responsible for bringing the person to the United Kingdom, the choice of carrier would be a matter for that company. Where the cost falls to public funds, we would normally give directions for removal on the first available flight to the country concerned.

Illegal Immigrants

Mr. Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent research his Department has commissioned into the effect on race relations of illegal immigrants. [26728]

Angela Eagle: The Home Office has not commissioned any recent research specifically into the effect on race relations of illegal immigrants, but is considering a broad range of research on immigration including improving knowledge of the illegal population and improving the integration of refugees and other migrants into communities.

The current year's research programme of the Research Development and Statistics Directorate, including the work on immigration, is published on the website, which can be found at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/ resprog1.html.

Mr. Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the estimated cost to his Department was of illegal immigrants in the last 12 months. [26841]

Angela Eagle: This information is not available as the Immigration and Nationality Directorate does not quantify the costs of illegal entrants separately from those of its other activities.

Prostitutes

Sir Teddy Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his answer of 9 January 2002, Official Report, columns 893–95W, if he will make a statement explaining the nature of the public policy limitations which will enable the UK to prevent Polish, Czech and Slovak nationals establishing themselves as self-employed prostitutes in the UK despite the EU Court of Justice decision 268/99 published on 11 December. [27504]

Angela Eagle [holding answer 16 January 2002]: The European Union Court of Justice decision 268/99 ruled that a member state is entitled to rely on the public policy

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limitation aspect of the Association agreements where it adopts measures designed to combat prostitution carried out by its own nationals.

The United Kingdom adopts a number of measures designed to combat prostitution. In particular, soliciting is an offence. Should a Polish, Czech or Slovak national seek to enter the United Kingdom in order to establish themselves as a self-employed prostitute they would, in order to conduct that business successfully, have to engage in an illegal activity. Therefore, the United Kingdom would be within its rights to refuse such an application on public policy grounds.

Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act

Mr. Colman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when Part 12 of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 will take effect. [27481]

Mr. Keith Bradley: We intend that Part 12 of the 2001 Act will take effect on 14 February 2002, in accordance with a Commencement Order which will be made under section 127 of the Act.

Asylum and Immigration Act

Mr. Joyce: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of Judicial Reviews on asylum decisions have been successful since the Asylum and Immigration Act 1999 came into force. [27454]

Angela Eagle: Since October 2000, when the Asylum and Immigration Act 1999 came into force, 1,546 Judicial Reviews have been lodged against asylum decisions. Of the 645 Judicial Reviews where the final outcome has been made known, 69 applicants (10.7 per cent.) have been successful in obtaining the relief sought. By comparison, 110 applicants have withdrawn their applications during the judicial process.

Departmental Staff (Home Working)

Mr. Challen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps his Department is taking to encourage staff to work from home; and how many staff do so on a regular basis. [21826]

Mr. Blunkett: The Home Office is committed to the work-life balance of its staff as part of its commitment to the diversity agenda. A range of flexible working patterns, including flexible working hours, part-time working, job sharing, and home working are available to staff by agreement with their management.

Guidance on the range of work-life balance options for staff was first published in a booklet, "Balancing Work and Home Responsibilities", in 1997. Subsequent developments reflect changes in technology which allow staff secure access to some Home Office systems remotely via laptop computers specifically developed for this purpose.

Over 350 staff have laptop computers which have facilities for them to access the Department's information technology system remotely, and many more have equipment which allows them to read or write documents off-line. Information on the number of staff who do so is

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not collected centrally but managers are responsible for ensuring that staff working from home are properly authorised to do so.

People Trafficking

Mr. Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the UK Government have made a financial contribution to the Global Programme Against Trafficking in Human Beings launched by the Centre for International Crime Prevention. [26903]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: As major donors, the British Government contribute 5.58 per cent. of the United Nations Centre for International Crime Prevention's (CICP) regular budget. We are currently considering what additional donations we might make to CICP work during this financial year.

Mr. Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the (a) number and (b) percentage of asylum seekers who enter the UK as a result of third party traffickers who assist their passage. [26904]

Angela Eagle: Information about the numbers involved is not collected centrally. However, it is clear from the analysis of interviewing and debriefing conducted for intelligence purposes that the majority of asylum seekers are assisted in some way. I understand that this is consistent with the experiences of other European Union member states.

Mr. Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions his Department has had in the past six months with the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe about trafficking in human beings. [26902]

Angela Eagle: There are a number of initiatives on trafficking with which the Organisation for Security and Co-operation (OSCE) is associated, including the Anti- Trafficking Task Force of the Stability Pact for South East Europe. Officials from both the Home Office and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office have been in regular contact with the (OSCE) in Europe on this subject.


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