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Criminal Justice and Police Act

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions have been initiated under section 46 of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001. [25105]

Mr. Keith Bradley: The Home Office Court Proceedings Database began separately identifying prosecutions completed for this offence from 1 January of this year. Such information will become available, after the publication of court proceedings statistics for 2002, in the autumn of next year.

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Bachir Aouni

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the money defrauded from Barclays Bank by Bachir Aouni and his associates has been traced; and if he will make a statement. [25178]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: The tracing of property suspected to be the proceeds of crime is a matter for the police.

Traffic Offences

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many traffic offences were

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committed by drivers under the age of 16 in each of the last 20 years. [25019]

Mr. Keith Bradley: Data prior to 1990 are not

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available for the age group required. The table gives information on offences most likely to have involved a traffic offence.

Findings of guilt at all courts for traffic offences(10) committed by offenders aged 10–15 years and offence group
England and Wales 1990–2000

Number of offences
Offence groupOffence type(10)19901991199219931994199519961997199819992000
Age 10–15
1Causing death or bodily harm4(11)2048447663
2Dangerous driving208(11)226111111150116105130138173
3Driving etc. after consuming alcohol or taking drugs65(11)41425989135128114120129
4Careless driving219(11)131102117129123109135146202
5Accident offences180(11)105121133126111118123144189
16Speed limit offences15(11)2062951081212
17Motorway offences (other than speeding)0(11)110001100
18Neglect of traffic directions75(11)525544718656698097
19Neglect of pedestrian rights40(11)201835363020222925
20Obstruction, waiting and parking offences5(11)132222323
24Offences peculiar to motor cycles443(11)256279398448408410422397452
25Miscellaneous motoring offences110(11)85111111157959210512089
Total traffic offences1,364(11)9588531,0201,2211,1151,0581,1381,1941,374
As a percentage of total offences committed by persons all ages0.25(11)0.180.200.250.300.270.270.270.290.36

(10) The list of offence types group those offences most likely to have involved a traffic offence. They exclude offences committed by pedal cyclists.

(11) Not available.

Note:

Data taken from the Home Office Court Proceedings Database.


Taxis

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many incidents there were in which taxi drivers and minicab drivers were successfully prosecuted for (a) causing death by dangerous driving and (b) driving without due care and attention in each of the last 10 years. [25119]

Mr. Keith Bradley: Information held centrally on the Home Office Court Proceedings Database does not identify the occupation of a defendant. For some offences the occupation can be inferred from the offence description but this is not the case for causing death by dangerous driving or driving without due care and attention.

Child Trafficking

Llew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the extent of the slave trade in children in the United Kingdom. [25199]

Mr. Keith Bradley: There are currently no reliable data about trafficking in people either nationally or internationally. The clandestine nature of the offence means that it is difficult to measure the extent to which the United Kingdom receives children trafficked for sexual and labour exploitation. However, there is no evidence to indicate that there is large-scale trafficking of children to the United Kingdom.

The United Kingdom is one of the strongest supporters of the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) Convention on the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour. In recognition of the seriousness of the offence of trafficking children on an international scale, we are working across Government, and with a variety of organisations, to encourage ratification and implementation of the convention world-wide.

Air Weapons

Mark Tami: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what was the average age of individuals convicted of offences involving air weapons in the last year; [25140]

Mr. Keith Bradley: The available information for England and Wales is in terms of convictions for offences involving air weapons as defined under the Fireams Acts, as opposed to all offences where air weapons were used. The table, derived from the Home Office Court Proceedings Database, gives the number of persons convicted in 2000 and their average ages for those offences identified by the database.

Information relating to Scotland and Northern Ireland are matters for my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Persons convicted of offences(12) under the Firearms Acts connected with air weapons—England and Wales 2000

England(13) Wales
OffencePersons convictedAverage agePersons convictedAverage age
Possessing air weapon or imitation air weapon at time of committing or being arrested for an offence specified in schedule 1 of the Act215113
Possessing air weapon or imitation air weapon with intent to commit an indictable offence, or resist arrest etc.416
Possession of an air weapon or imitation air weapon with intent to cause fear of violence2017
Possession of air weapons by persons previously convicted of crime3027627
Supplying air weapons to person denied them under section 21
Carrying loaded air gun in public place etc.160211024
Trespassing with air weapon in a building315
Trespassing with air weapon on land1722138
Person under 17 acquiring air weapon316
Person under 14 having with him an air weapon or ammunition therefor1512112
Person under 17 having with him an air weapon in a public place4715515
Person under 14 making improper use of air weapon when under supervision111
Person supervising person under 14, permitting improper use of air weapon125139
Selling or letting on hire an air weapon to person under 17
Supplying air weapon to person under 14228
Supplying air weapon to person drunk or insane
Failure to hand over air weapon or ammunition on demand by constable
Total305202523

(12) Data are given on a principal offence basis.

(13) Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against at magistrates court for the year 2000. Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust at a detailed level and have been excluded from this table.

Source:

Home Office Crime and Criminal Justice Unit


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Unlicensed Vehicles

Mark Tami: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions were secured for the non-payment of road fund licence in the last year in (a) Wales, (b) England, (c) Northern Ireland and (d) Scotland. [25134]

Mr. Keith Bradley: Information taken from the Home Office Court Proceedings Database shows that in 2000 there were 21,580 convictions in Wales for offences under the Vehicle Excise and Registration Act 1994, s29—failure to pay appropriate duty—and 278,641 convictions within England.

Information relating to Northern Ireland and Scotland are matters for my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Northern Ireland and Scotland.


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