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Stamp Duty

Hugh Robertson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much money HM Treasury has made from stamp duty on property sales in each of the past five years. [22610]

Mr. Boateng: Receipts from stamp duty charged on sales of land and property, for the last five financial years for which figures are available, from the Inland Revenue Statistics website http://www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk/stats.

HOME DEPARTMENT

Police (Early Retirement)

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what action he will take to assist (a) North Yorkshire police and (b) other forces to tackle the impact of early retirement on officer levels. [10185]

Mr. Denham: The Home Office has asked the Police Negotiating Board to explore and agree ways to deliver a fair and more consistent approach towards early retirement due to ill health, so that forces, including North Yorkshire police, can match the performance of the best quartile by 2005. We also hope to introduce a national Occupational Health strategy for the police service, which should assist forces to manage cases of ill-health more effectively at the outset.

Antisocial Behaviour Orders

Mr. Cousins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many antisocial behaviour orders there have been in each magistrates court committee area since 1 June 2000. [20766]

Mr. Denham: Official statistics on the number of antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) issued are based on quarterly returns received from magistrates courts committees (MCC). A review identified an under-count and my Department therefore undertook an exercise with

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the police to obtain more reliable figures. As a result of this reconciliation exercise the total number of ASBOs issued up until the end of September this year was 466, 184 more than previously reported. A breakdown by MCC area is given in the table.

Number of antisocial behaviour orders(12) issued up to 30 September 2001 by magistrates court committee area

MCC area Up to 31 May 20001 June 2000 to 30 September 2001Total
Avon and Somerset91928
Bedfordshire22
Cambridgeshire538
Cheshire
Cleveland1910
Cumbria112
Derbyshire3912
Devon and Cornwall1910
Dorset44
Durham1010
Essex
Gloucestershire44
GLMCA(13)93140
Great Manchester101424
Hampshire134
Hertfordshire189
Humberside1111
Kent1515
Lancashire51116
Leicestershire145
Lincolnshire11
Merseyside8917
Norfolk61117
Northamptonshire33
Northumbria8715
North Yorkshire4610
Nottinghamshire11516
South Yorkshire336
Staffordshire1010
Suffolk325
Surrey44
Sussex347
Thames Valley167
Warwickshire33
West Mercia54247
West Midlands115465
West Yorkshire41115
Wiltshire
Dyfed Powys
Gwent11
North Wales11
South Wales22
England and Wales104466466

(12) Implemented from 1 April 1999 and data collected centrally from 1 June 2000 (including data from reconciliation exercise)

(13) Greater London Magistrates Courts Authority


National Black Police Association

Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what legally privileged information has been seized or obtained by surveillance of Dr. Ali Dizaei. [13710]

Mr. Denham: I would refer the hon. Member to my letter to him of 9 November, a copy of which has been placed in the Library.

Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the standards of promptness and diligence he expects in

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the investigation of the National Black Police Association complaints against DAC Hayman and Superintendent Norman. [13712]

Mr. Denham: I am assured by the Chairman of the Metropolitan Police Authority and the Metropolitan Police Commissioner that both the authority and the Metropolitan police service have taken all necessary and appropriate action as outlined in the relevant police regulations and legislation to deal with matters with due promptness and diligence.

Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what action will be taken in relation to the investigating officer who authorised the interception of legally privileged conversations of Dr. Ali Dizaei in his role as the legal adviser to the National Black Police Association. [13707]

Mr. Denham: I understand from the Chairman of the Metropolitan Police Authority that the authority has received a complaint into which it is making preliminary inquiries under the provisions of the Police (Conduct) (Senior Officers) Regulations 1999.

Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will assess the impact on black staff in the Police Service who sought legal advice from Dr. Ali Dizaei by the recording, transcription or use of privileged conversations of the legal adviser to the National Black Police Association. [13709]

Mr. Denham: I have no plans at present to institute a review. I would refer the hon. Member to my letter to him of 9 November, which clarifies the position regarding the telephone calls that Superintendent Dizaei made in connection with his National Black Police Association business. A copy of this letter is in the Library.

Speed Cameras

Mr. Clapham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the level of accuracy is, on average, of speed cameras over the calibrated distance marked on the road. [22229]

Mr. Denham [holding answer 12 December 2001]: There is no average figure for the accuracy of speed cameras. In order to ensure their accuracy and reliability all speed cameras have to be of a type approved by the Secretary of State, after rigorous testing, before evidence from them can be used in proceedings.

Measurements of vehicle speed are made by radar or by sensors in the road. Radar displays a primary speed using several hundred measurements taken during the passage of the vehicle through its beam. It requires most of these to be within two kilometres per hour. Devices using sensors on or in the road show a primary speed which is the lower of two measurements taken between different sensor pairs. The speed is only shown when they agree within two miles per hour.

The calibrated distance marked on the road is used only to provide an independent secondary check of the primary speed measurement. The two measurements should be within 10 per cent.

Mr. Clapham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much money has been raised by fines on drivers caught speeding by speed cameras;

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and how the money is apportioned between (a) local police forces, (b) local authorities and (c) the Home Office. [22230]

Mr. Denham [holding answer 12 December 2001]: The table gives information on the number of fixed penalties for speeding offences over the last five years where cameras have provided the evidence and the estimated revenue from fines. All the money has been paid to Her Majesty's (HM) Treasury.

Fixed penaltiesEstimated revenue (£ million)
1995170,0006.8
1996212,6008.8
1997288,60011.5
1998338,80013.6
1999423,00016.9

Notes:

1. Automatic cameras from 1995 until 1998, all camera types for 1999.

2. Estimate based on number of fixed penalty notices accepted for payment at £40 each from 1995 to 1999 for England and Wales.

3. Figures for 2000 not yet available.


From April 2000 eight partnerships, comprising local police forces, local authorities, highways authorities and magistrates courts have been piloting a new 'netting off' scheme. This allows the fixed penalty revenue from speed and red-light traffic cameras to be re-invested to fund additional camera enforcement.

Under the scheme, local magistrates courts within a partnership collect all fixed-penalty notice and fine revenue from offenders. The element to be netted off goes to the partnership's Local Authority, which acts as treasurer for the scheme, and distributes the funds to each of the partners on the basis of invoiced spend. Any revenue not used for camera enforcement goes to HM Treasury. The Home Office receives no money.

In August the Government announced the national roll-out of the netting off scheme, and a further seven partnership areas joined the scheme in October 2001.

Mr. Clapham: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what degree of tolerance to speed is allowed by the speed cameras; and whether this differs between counties. [22228]

Mr. Denham [holding answer 12 December 2001]: Speed cameras indicate whether or not a driver may be exceeding the speed limit. The enforcement of speed limits is an operational matter for chief officers of police. The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) published guidelines on speed enforcement thresholds in February 2000 to support a transparent and consistent approach, while recognising that not all speeding offences are the same. The police retain discretion to take account of the particular circumstances of any individual speeding incident.

The thresholds guidelines are available on the ACPO website, at www.acpo.police.uk.


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