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Deprived Wards

Norman Lamb: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions if he will publish, in rank order, the 100 most deprived wards in the Government office eastern region, indicating their (a) local authority and (b) parliamentary constituency. [20379]

Ms Keeble: The information has been placed in the Libraries of the House.

4 Dec 2001 : Column 290W

Mr. Woodward: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions if he will list in rank order the 100 most deprived wards in the Government office north-west region, indicating the (a) local authority and (b) parliamentary constituency. [19561]

Ms Keeble: The following 100 wards in the Government office north-west region are sorted by Index of Multiple Deprivation (2000).

Number/wardLocal authorityParliamentary constituency
1. BenchillManchesterWythenshawe and Sale, East BC
2. SpekeLiverpoolLiverpool, Garston BC
3. EvertonLiverpoolLiverpool, Riverside BC
4. VauxhallLiverpoolLiverpool, Riverside BC
5. PrincessKnowsleyKnowsley, South CC
6. GranbyLiverpoolLiverpool, Riverside BC
7. PirrieLiverpoolLiverpool, West Derby BC
8. BreckfieldLiverpoolLiverpool, Walton BC
9. LongviewKnowsleyKnowsley, South CC
10. CherryfieldKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
11. HarpurheyManchesterManchester, Blackley BC
12. Beswick and ClaytonManchesterManchester, Central BC
13. Kirby CentralKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
14. NorthwoodKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
15. BradfordManchesterManchester, Central BC
16. BidstonWirralBirkenhead BC
17. MelroseLiverpoolLiverpool, Walton BC
18. ClubmoorLiverpoolLiverpool, West Derby BC
19. SmithdownLiverpoolLiverpool, Riverside BC
20. ArdwickManchesterManchester, Central BC
21. DovecotLiverpoolLiverpool, West Derby BC
22. Cantril FarmKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
23. WhitefieldPendlePendle BC
24. CentralManchesterManchester, Central BC
25. NetherleyLiverpoolLiverpool, Garston BC
26. Newton HeathManchesterManchester, Central BC
27. KensingtonLiverpoolLiverpool, Wavertree BC
28. CentralBoltonBolton, North-East BC
29. Central and FalingeRochdaleRochdale CC
30. BirkenheadWirralBirkenhead BC
31. LinacreSeftonBootle BC
32. TranmereWirralBirkenhead
33. Tower HillKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
34. AudleyBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn CC
35. DanehouseBurnleyBurnley BC
36. Gorton SouthManchesterManchester, Gorton BC
37. Woodhouse ParkManchesterWythenshawe and Sale, East BC
38. Middleton WestRochdaleHeywood and Middleton CC
39. Moss SideManchesterManchester, Central BC
40. ColdhurstOldhamOldham, West and Royton BC
41. WernethOldhamOldham, West and Royton BC
42. ShadsworthBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn BC
43. AlexandraOldhamOldham, West and Royton BC
44. Mirehouse WestCopelandCopeland CC
45. St. Mary'sLiverpoolLiverpool, Garston BC
46. CentralHyndburnHyndburn BC
47. SandwithCopelandCopeland CC
48. Higher CroftBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn BC
49. SmallbridgeRochdaleRochdale CC
50. Wensley FoldBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn BC
51. St. Mary'sOldhamOldham, East and Saddleworth
52. LongsightManchesterManchester, Gorton BC
53. CentralBarrow-in-FurnessBarrow and Furness CC
54. Parr and HardshawSt. HelensSt. Helens, South BC
55. Shear BrowBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn BC
56. Queen's ParkBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn BC
57. ValleyLiverpoolLiverpool, Garston BC
58. BroughtonSalfordSalford BC
59. BradleyPendlePendle BC
60. DerbyBoltonBolton, South-East BC
61. Little HultonSalfordWorsley CC
62. Knowsley ParkKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
63. SalterbeckAllerdaleWorkington CC
64. St. Michael'sKnowsleyKnowsley, South
65. CastlefieldsHaltonWeaver Vale CC
66. BrinningtonStockportStockport BC
67. HulmeManchesterManchester Central BC
68. AbercrombyLiverpoolLiverpool, Riverside BC
69. CheethamManchesterManchester, Blackley BC
70. BlackfriarsSalfordSalford BC
71. St. GabrielsKnowsleyKnowsley, South CC
72. OrdsallSalfordSalford BC
73. CountyLiverpoolLiverpool, Walton BC
74. ParkBlackpoolKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
75. NorleyWiganWigan CC
76. EwanriggAllerdaleWorkington CC
77. AlexandraBlackpoolOldham, West and Royton BC
78. SeacombeWirralWallasey BC
79. Bank HallBurnleyBurnley BC
80. Halewood SouthKnowsleyKnowsley, South CC
81. TanhouseWest LancashireWest Lancashire CC
82. BastwellBlackburn with DarwenBlackburn BC
83. FishwickPrestonPreston BC
84. RisedaleBarrow-in-FurnessBarrow and Furness CC
85. ClaremontBlackpoolBlackpool, North and Fleetwood CC
86. PendletonSalfordSalford BC
87. WhitefieldKnowsleyKnowsley, North and Sefton, East CC
88. LightbowneManchesterManchester, Blackley BC
89. DingleLiverpoolLiverpool, Riverside BC
90. RibbletonPrestonPreston BC
91. RiversideHaltonHalton CC
92. BarclayBurnleyBurnley BC
93. HindpoolBarrow-in-FurnessBarrow and Furness CC
94. Page MossKnowsleyKnowsley, South CC
95. TuebrookLiverpoolLiverpool, West Derby BC
96. BaguleyManchesterWythenshawe and Sale, East BC
97. NewboldRochdaleRochdale CC
98. LangworthySalfordSalford BC
99. BlackleyManchesterManchester, Blackley BC
100. FazakerleyLiverpoolLiverpool, Walton BC

4 Dec 2001 : Column 291W

SSA (Somerset)

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions what action he plans to take to ensure that Somerset county council's standard spending assessment is set at a level to reflect (a) the costs of delivering services in rural areas, (b) the size of the county's road network, (c) the demands on social services due to the level of the elderly population and (d) the backlog of capital works; and if he will make a statement. [18880]

4 Dec 2001 : Column 292W

Dr. Whitehead: All of the factors referred to in the question are reflected to some extent in the current Standard Spending Assessment formulae, which are used to allocate between councils the resources made available by the spending review. We are currently reviewing those formulae and have announced our intention to implement changes to take effect in 2003–04. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State is today announcing the provisional 2002–03 local government finance settlement.

4 Dec 2001 : Column 293W

Rough Sleepers

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions what methodology was used by Rough Sleepers' Unit and its predecessor to count the number of people sleeping rough on any single night since 1997; and if he will make a statement regarding the reasons for changes in the methodology used. [20532]

Mr. Byers: The methodology used by the Rough Sleepers Unit to count the number of people sleeping rough on any single night was developed in the early 1990s by the Department, in partnership with the voluntary sector. The methodology used for producing a national estimate was set out in an answer given by my right hon. Friend the then Minister for Local Government and the Regions on 19 May 1999, Official Report, columns 355–62W and has been tested and developed through independent research and remains unchanged. The same methodology has been used nationally for over five years, and since the early 1990s in London.

Counts are conducted by voluntary sector homelessness agencies, working with local authorities and independent volunteers. The results are finalised and submitted by these agencies to the Rough Sleepers Unit. The methodology for counts is adhered to strictly and consistently.

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions how many people obtained permanent housing after being housed in (a) bed and breakfast accommodation and (b) hostels by the Rough Sleepers' Unit for (i) less than one week, (ii) between one week and one month and (iii) over one month, in each quarter since the unit was established. [20528]

Mr. Byers: Under the Government's strategy on rough sleeping, the Rough Sleepers Unit funds a number of agencies to provide permanent and temporary accommodation for rough sleepers and to refer people sleeping rough, or with a history of rough sleeping, into that accommodation and other services.

Information is not available in the format requested. Information from the Clearing House which manages referrals to permanent accommodation in London provided with Government funding shows that:

During the last financial year (1 April 2000 to 31 March 2001), 669 former rough sleepers were housed in permanent homes.

A total of 898 former rough sleepers were referred to the Clearing House for permanent accommodation during 2000–01, of whom:


These referrals have played a vital part in helping the Rough Sleepers Unit to achieve its target of reducing rough sleeping in England by two-thirds.

4 Dec 2001 : Column 294W

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions how many people were housed in (a) bed and breakfast accommodation and (b) hostels by the Rough Sleepers' Unit for (i) less than one week, (ii) between one week and one month and (iii) over one month in each quarter since the unit was established. [20529]

Mr. Byers: Under the Government's current strategy on rough sleeping, the Rough Sleepers Unit provides funding for a number of agencies who provide permanent and temporary accommodation. The Unit also funds a number of agencies to provide outreach workers and Contact and Assessment Teams who help rough sleepers into accommodation and other services. Staff from the Unit do not routinely refer rough sleepers into accommodation. However, they do from time to time liaise with agencies to ensure that any vulnerable rough sleepers they encounter during street work are helped into appropriate accommodation and support.

Information on referrals into accommodation is not available in the format requested. Monitoring information from the database of Contact and Assessment Team's clients in London is given.

Over the twelve months between 1 April 2000 and 31 March 2001, 1,679 rough sleepers were helped into accommodation. Some were helped into accommodation more than once. The total number of referrals from the streets for those 1,679 individuals was 2,485. These referrals were to the following types of accommodation:

ActionNumber who entered accommodation
Booked into permanent accommodation151
Booked into a hostel1,211
Booked into a rolling shelter719
Booked into other temporary accommodation63
Accessed specialist treatment programme252
Admission to a night centre86
Booked into Bed and Breakfast accommodation3
Total2485

Of the 1,679 individuals who were referred into these forms of accommodation during the period, 1,262 (75 per cent.) were still in accommodation at the end of the year.

These referrals have played a vital part in helping the Rough Sleepers Unit to achieve its target of reducing rough sleeping in England by two-thirds.


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