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Antisocial Behaviour Orders

Mr. Stevenson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many antisocial behaviour orders have been (a) applied for and (b) granted in (i) Staffordshire and (ii) Stoke-on-Trent. [2668]

Mr. Denham: The number of antisocial behaviour orders being applied for and issued is collected centrally by magistrates courts committee (MCC) area only. Between April 1999 and March 2001, two antisocial behaviour orders, both of which were granted, were applied for in the Staffordshire MCC.

Mr. Paul Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the effectiveness of antisocial behaviour orders in the Shrewsbury division of West Mercia Constabulary. [2536]

Mr. Denham: Since my predecessor, the then Minister of State, my right hon. Friend the Member for Norwich, South (Mr. Clarke), answered my hon. Friend's earlier question on this subject on 4 April 2001, Official Report, column 214W, the Shrewsbury division of West Mercia constabulary has obtained a further 18 antisocial behaviour orders bringing the total for the division to some 24 orders. These orders have helped to curb intimidatory begging in the town centre and antisocial behaviour by groups of young people in other parts of the division. I applaud the efforts of the local police, and congratulate them on their success.

Charities (Audit)

Mr. Stunell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what he calculates to be the threshold level of turnover of charities needed to trigger full annual audits if the current provision had been indexed in line with that applied to company audits since its introduction; [2786]

Angela Eagle: There are no plans at present to uprate the threshold level triggering full annual audits for charity accounts although the matter is kept under review.

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Part VI of the Charities Act 1993 and the associated Regulations and Statements of Recommended Practice provide the accounting framework for charities. The accounting requirements are graduated and vary with the size of the charity. Charities with gross income or total expenditure of over £250,000 (in the current or two previous financial years) are required to produce audited accounts.

Charities that are registered as companies are subject to the Companies Acts and must file their accounts with Companies House. They are also subject to charity law. The audit threshold for a charitable company is £250,000 gross income, as provided for in the Companies Act 1985 (Audit Exemption) (Amendment) Regulations 1997.

The auditing threshold for non-charitable companies was raised last year from £350,000 to £1 million, an increase of approximately 280 per cent., but the decision was taken at that time to retain the existing threshold for charitable companies. A similar increase for charities would raise the threshold to the order of £700,000.

Good charity accounts which show how the charity is using its resources and which are reliable, consistent and available to the public are important in demonstrating openness and public accountability. The particular public interest in charities and charitable companies calls for an accounting system for them which is different from that which is appropriate for non-charitable organisations.

Prison Staff (Salaries)

Mr. Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will increase the salaries of prison staff in discipline and administration grades. [2849]

Beverley Hughes: Prison officers and related support grades received a two per cent. increase in pay from 1 January 2001. Also, locality payments for those working in and around London were increased by between £517 and £873 a year. This year's pay changes for administrative grades are still subject to the outcome of negotiations. The pay of most of these Prison Service staff will be handled differently from next year.

On 9 February 2001, Official Report, column 747W, my right hon. Friend the then Secretary of State for the Home Office announced plans to set up a Prison Service Pay Review Body to make independent recommendations to the Government on the pay of prison officers and related support grades employed in public sector prisons in England and Wales, and the Northern Ireland Prison Service. This came into effect on 17 April 2001. It is due to make its first recommendations with effect from 1 January 2002. The pay of prison administrative staff, who are outside the Review Body remit, will remain subject to direct annual negotiation between the Prison Service and the Prison Service Trade Union Side.

Mental Health Care

Dr. Naysmith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to implement (a) Part I and (b) Part II of the White Paper "Reform of the Mental Health Act". [2952]

Beverley Hughes: The Government are committed to reform of the Mental Health Act 1983 and will introduce the legislation needed to give effect to both parts of the

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White Paper as soon as parliamentary time allows. This will include proposals—set out in Part 2—to deal with the small minority of those mentally disordered people who present a high risk to others, including those who are dangerous and severely personality disordered.

Good progress is being made on all aspects of the service development required for the creation of new services for those who are dangerous and severely personality disordered and for the modernisation of mental health services generally.

Feltham Young Offenders Prison

Mr. Gareth R. Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many inmates there were at Feltham Young Offenders Prison in each of the last five years. [3129]

Beverley Hughes: The average population at Feltham Young Offenders Institution in each of the last five years is given in the table.

Financial yearAverage population HMYOI Feltham
2000–01698
1999–2000798
1998–99878
1997–98894
1996–97865

Ministerial Visits

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when his predecessor (a) first visited and (b) last visited (i) Indonesia, (ii) Turkey, (iii) Saudi Arabia, (iv) South Africa, (v) Chile, (vi) Argentina, (vii) Sudan, (viii) Taiwan, (ix) the UAE and (x) Cuba. [1824]

Mr. Blunkett: As far as records show, my predecessor did not visit Indonesia, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Chile, Argentina, Sudan, Taiwan, the United Arab Emirates and Cuba in his capacity as Home Secretary.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when his predecessor (a) first visited and (b) last visited (i) Canada, (ii) Australia and (iii) New Zealand. [1837]

Mr. Blunkett: As far as records show, my predecessor did not visit Canada, Australia or New Zealand in his capacity as Home Secretary.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when his predecessor (a) first visited and (b) last visited, (i) Brazil, (ii) Bolivia, (iii) Mexico, (iv) Guatemala and (v) Peru. [1932]

Mr. Blunkett: As far as records show, my predecessor did not visit Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico, Guatemala or Peru in his capacity as Home Secretary.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when his predecessor (a) first visited and (b) last visited (i) Rwanda, (ii) Democratic Republic of Congo, (iii) Central African Republic, (iv) Mozambique and (v) Nigeria. [1954]

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Mr. Blunkett: As far as records show, my predecessor did not visit Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Mozambique and Nigeria in his capacity as Home Secretary.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when his predecessor (a) first visited and (b) last visited (i) South Korea and (ii) Malaysia. [1947]

Mr. Blunkett: As far as records show, my predecessor did not visit South Korea or Malaysia in his capacity as Home Secretary.

Prostitution

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he will publish a summary of the responses to the consultation "Setting the Boundaries"; and if he will make a statement on the adequacy of the current legal framework governing prostitution. [3227]

Mr. Keith Bradley: We received in excess of 650 responses to "Setting the Boundaries". Officials are now assessing these responses and we will be considering the best way to make a summary available to hon. Members once this analysis has been completed.

We have no plans to change the law relating to prostitution at present. However, one of the 62 recommendations made to Ministers in "Setting the Boundaries" is that there should be a further review of the law on prostitution. We will be carefully considering the responses to this recommendation before reaching a decision on it.


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