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Transparency International Corruption Index

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the change in ranking of the UK in the Transparency International Corruption Index; and if he will (a) make a statement on his plans to tackle money laundering and (b) introduce legislation to make bribery of foreign officials a crime. [2275]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: I have been asked to reply.

Although the United Kingdom has shifted from 10th to 13th out of 91 countries in the Transparency International Corruption Index, it remains better placed than most other countries, including all but one of its G8 partners.

Legislation to amend the law on money laundering and corruption was announced in the Queen's Speech on 20 June 2001. The legislation on corruption will cover the bribery of foreign officials.

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER

Public Opinion Research

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister how much revenue has been raised by projects undertaken by the People's Panel for clients other than his own Department for each financial year for which the figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [2679]

Mr. Leslie: The People's Panel is not intended to raise revenue for the Government. For clients other than the Cabinet Office, the costs of research undertaken using the People's Panel were none in 1998–99; £126,150 in 1999–2000; and £187,515 in 2000–01. These costs are essentially composed of fees to MORI, which conducts research through the Panel on behalf of the Government.

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister by what process he ensures that other Departments follow Cabinet Office guidelines on publication of research into public opinion and attitudes; and if he will make a statement. [2680]

Mr. Leslie: Guidance on Government Research into Public Attitudes and Opinion was published in May 2000 and is available on the Cabinet Office website at http://www.cabinet-office.gov.uk/central/2000/guidance–on–government–research–attitudes.htm. This guidance was developed following extensive consultation with Departments, reflects existing best practice and reminds Departments that public expenditure must not be used for party political purposes. Departments are encouraged in the guidance to pass it to others carrying out research of this sort such as non-departmental public bodies and to publish the results of research, for example, by placing them in the House of Commons Library and making them publicly available on request and on the internet. Results

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must be made publicly available unless they are exempt under the terms of the Code of Practice on Access to Government Information or, when the Freedom of Information Act 2000 comes into force, they are covered by an exemption in the Act.

Departmental Responsibility (Regions)

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister if he will make a statement on the recent division of regional responsibilities between different Departments. [1473]

The Prime Minister: I am replying to this question as it relates to ministerial responsibilities.

My right hon. friend the Deputy Prime Minister is leading the preparation of a White Paper on elected regional government in England, working in close liaison with the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions and in co-operation with other Cabinet colleagues. The Deputy Prime Minister is also responsible for the Regional Co-ordination Unit and has overall responsibility for the Government Office network.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions is responsible for regional policy as a whole and for implementation of the proposals to be included in the White paper.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry is responsible for the Regional Development Agencies.

Homelessness

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what recent assessment his Department has made of the scale of rough sleeping and homelessness among older people; and if he will make a statement. [2975]

Ms Keeble: I have been asked to reply.

An analysis of statistical returns provided to the Housing Services Agency over the past six months indicates that around 20 per cent. of rough sleepers are over 50 years old.

Across the country older rough sleepers are able to access the majority of services funded by the Rough Sleepers Unit.

In central London specific contact and assessment team workers provide support to vulnerable older rough sleepers. The unit has also funded "Night Centres" to enable older rough sleepers who have been out on the streets for a number of years to accept gradually help to come inside permanently. "Night Centres" have opened in London, Bristol and Manchester over the last year.

There are a number of hostels specifically for older residents including St. Mungo's, Harrow Road and Bondway, Robertson Street. However, all hostels, day centres and emergency shelters that do not specifically cater for younger rough sleepers will work with a broad range of clients.

Under homelessness legislation, older people are also included in the groups that are treated as being in priority need of housing.

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HOME DEPARTMENT

Antisocial Behaviour Orders

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the average cost of obtaining an antisocial behaviour order is; [1255]

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Mr. Denham: The average cost of an antisocial behaviour order, based on a recent survey of 20 cases, was £5,480. Less than one in 20 applications has been refused so far. Figures for the cost of the eight applications which have been refused (listed in the table) are not available centrally.

Antisocial behaviour orders applied for and made between 1 April 1999 and 31 March 2001 by police force area within England and Wales

Number made from:
Police force areaNumber of applications to 31 March 2001(9),(10)1 April 1999 to 31 May 2000(9)1 June 2000 to 31 March 2001(10)Total
Avon and Somerset139413
Bedfordshire
Cambridgeshire555
Cheshire
Cleveland5134
Cumbria111
Derbyshire113811
Devon and Cornwall3123
Dorset222
Durham666
Essex
Gloucestershire111
Greater Manchester1310313
Hampshire211
Hertfordshire5145
Humberside101010
Kent101010
Lancashire125712
Leicestershire111
Lincolnshire
Merseyside1288
Metropolitan police service(11)2391221
Norfolk106410
Northamptonshire
Northumbria128412
North Yorkshire444
Nottinghamshire5145
South Yorkshire4314
Staffordshire222
Suffolk333
Surrey111
Sussex4314
Thames Valley111
Warwickshire111
West Mercia125712
West Midlands1811718
West Yorkshire9459
Wiltshire
England221104109213
Dyfed-Powys
Gwent
North Wales111
South Wales111
Wales222
England and Wales223104111215

(9) Based on data collected from ACPO and GLA trawls covering period 1 April 1999 to 31 May 2000

(10) Data collected centrally from magistrates courts committees as from 1 June 2000 onwards

(11) Includes City of London


Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the recent report from the Metropolitan Police Public Order Unit about the difficulties of obtaining antisocial behaviour orders; and what response he has made. [1247]

Mr. Denham: We have noted the references in the report to some of the problems faced in considering and applying for Antisocial Behaviour Orders (ASBOs). It is to be expected that a new provision will take some time to bed down. We are, nevertheless, conducting a review

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of these orders to evaluate their effectiveness and to identify best practice. The review should be completed later this year.

In the meantime we note from the report that 32 antisocial behaviour orders have been made in the Metropolitan police area between April 1999 and June this year and the very positive message about the benefits of the police working in partnership with local authorities and other agencies to tackle antisocial behaviour. Paragraph 12 of the report states:


Dr. Cable: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) antisocial behaviour orders and (b) antisocial behaviour contracts have been issued. [2349]

Mr. Denham: As at 31 March 2001 there have been 215 antisocial behaviours orders (ASBOs) issued within England and Wales.

An acceptable behaviour contract (ABC) is a voluntary written agreement between a person, whose behaviour is causing a problem, and the police or local authority. It will normally contain a list of antisocial actions which the person undertakes not to do and may also specify certain areas which he or she undertakes not to enter. The ABC is not enforceable in itself but a breach could lead to an ASBO.

We have no plans at present to ask local partnerships to collect statistics on these.

Ms Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many antisocial behaviour orders have been successfully applied for in each of the local authorities in Greater Manchester. [2336]

Mr. Denham: We understand that at least 10 antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) were issued in Greater Manchester between 1 April 1999 and 31 May 2000. From 1 June 2000 the number of such orders applied for and issued have been collected centrally. Between 1 June 2000 and 31 March 2001, three ASBOs were applied for and granted in Greater Manchester, two were issued within the North and West Greater Manchester Magistrates Courts Committee (MCC) area and one within the Trafford MCC. Figures by local authority area for the numbers of orders applied for are not held centrally.

Dr. Cable: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what evaluation has been made of the effectiveness and ease of implementation of antisocial

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behaviour (a) contracts and (b) orders; and what advice he is giving to local councils and the police on the merits and demerits of each. [2355]

Mr. Denham: As my predecessor confirmed in a written answer to my right hon. Friend the Member for Cardiff, South and Penarth (Mr. Michael) on 5 February 2001, Official Report, column 424W, we are also researching the operation and effectiveness of the antisocial behaviour order. We will also ensure the effectiveness of the acceptable behaviour scheme in Islington.

Guidance on antisocial behaviour orders was issued to the police and local authorities in March 1999 and June 2000. The previous Home Secretary made speeches and published a number of articles on the benefits of antisocial behaviour orders. Some of these also mentioned acceptable behaviour contracts. My right hon. Friend the Home Secretary and I will do the same as the opportunity arises.

Mr. Todd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how often antisocial behaviour orders have been used; and what assessment has been made of their effectiveness. [1421]

Mr. Denham: Based on figures for up to 31 March this year, 215 antisocial behaviour orders have been issued in England and Wales since 1 April 1999. The evidence so far shows that they have been used successfully in a variety of circumstances and to good effect.

We are currently conducting a comprehensive review of these orders to evaluate their effectiveness in dealing with antisocial behaviour and to identify best practice. We expect this review to be completed later this year and we will consider the report carefully.

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many antisocial behaviour orders have been issued since the relevant provisions of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into effect in each local authority area, broken down by (a) reason for the order, (b) average age of the subject of the order and (c) source of the order; and if he will make a statement. [2115]

Mr. Denham: Available information given in the table shows the number of antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOS) made by age group of subject and police force area. Information on local authority area, the reasons for the orders and the source of the orders is not collected centrally.

The evidence so far shows that they (ASBOs) have been used successfully in a variety of circumstances and to good effect.

We are currently conducting a comprehensive review of these orders to evaluate their effectiveness in dealing with antisocial behaviour and to identify best practice. We expect this review to be completed later this year and we will consider the report carefully.

Antisocial behaviour orders made between 1 April 1999 and 31 March 2001 by age group and police force area within England and Wales

Number made from 1 June 2000 to 31 March 2001(13)
Police force areaNumber made from 1 April 1999 to 31 May 2000(12)Age 10–17Age 18+Age unknownTotalTotal made from 1 April 1999 to 31 March 2001
Avon and Somerset922413
Bedfordshire
Cambridgeshire55
Cheshire
Cleveland1334
Cumbria11
Derbyshire317811
Devon and Cornwall11123
Dorset222
Durham32166
Essex
Gloucestershire111
Greater Manchester1012313
Hampshire11
Hertfordshire1445
Humberside2711010
Kent911010
Lancashire525712
Leicestershire11
Lincolnshire
Merseyside88
Metropolitan police service(14)94711221
Norfolk631410
Northamptonshire
Northumbria822412
North Yorkshire44
Nottinghamshire13145
South Yorkshire3114
Staffordshire222
Suffolk33
Surrey111
Sussex3114
Thames Valley11
Warwickshire111
West Mercia525712
West Midlands1161718
West Yorkshire44159
Wiltshire
England10452543109213
Dyfed-Powys
Gwent
North Wales111
South Wales111
Wales1122
England and Wales10453553111215

(12) Based on data collected from ACPO and GLA trawls covering period 1 April 1999 to 31 May 2000. Information on the age of recipients not available

(13) Data collected centrally from magistrates courts committees as from 1 June 2000 onwards

(14) Includes City of London


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Miss Widdecombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many antisocial behaviour orders have been issued in respect of (a) juveniles and (b) adults; and if he will make a statement. [2962]

Mr. Denham: A total of 104 antisocial behaviour orders were issued in England and Wales between 1 April 1999 and 31 May 2000. A breakdown by age for the orders issued in this period is not held centrally. However data collected centrally from June 2000 to 31 March 2001 show a further 111 antisocial behaviour orders being

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made of which 53 were given to persons aged 10 to 17 years, 55 to persons aged 18 and over and three where the age is unknown.


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