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Health Services (London)

Mr. Gareth R. Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what action the Government are taking to recruit more (a) nurses, (b) physiotherapists, (c) occupational therapists and (d) GPs in London; and if he will make a statement; [412]

Mr. Hutton: We are implementing a range of measures to improve recruitment and retention in the National Health Service for all staff, including London. Examples include investing in fair pay, encouraging the NHS to become a better employer, increasing training commissions for all professional groups, attracting former staff back to the NHS, encouraging flexible retirement, and supporting more effective, collaborative international

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recruitment where appropriate. We are also funding a recruitment campaign to raise the profile of social work and improve recruitment rates into social work.

In places where recruitment is most difficult, we are also looking at accommodation issues. For example, a NHS housing co-ordinator has been appointed in London to improve the recruitment and retention of key workers. The NHS Plan aims to provide 2000 residential units in London by 2004.

From March 2000 until May 2001, 661 nurses and midwives returned to practice in London.

By 2004 we will increase the number of general practitioners, nationally, by at least 2000 and increase the number of GP training places by 550. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State also announced a package of measures aimed at improving recruitment and retention of GPs on 13 March 2001. Other measures such as personal medical service pilots will attract GPs into deprived areas. In London we already have 265 GP registrars in training

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and are looking to increase training capacity to increase local supply. We are also seeing if we can increase the number of feeder senior house officer posts to increase the flow into the GP registrar grade. Increasing numbers of newly qualified pre-registration house officers are now getting exposure to general practice as part of their year's training.

Mr. Gareth R. Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations he has received about additional funding being given to London health authorities in recognition of the additional costs incurred by the health service in London; and if he will make a statement. [417]

Mr. Hutton: We have received one representation in the last three months about additional funding being given to London health authorities in recognition of the additional costs incurred by the health services in London.

Following the planning round an additional £155 million for 2001–02 has been made available to the National Health Service, partly in recognition of additional financial pressures. London received £25.4 million of this.

Primary Care Trusts

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how primary care trusts will be accountable for their use of public resources. [1129]

Mr. Hutton: The chief executive of the primary care trust (PCT), as accountable officer, is responsible for ensuring that the PCT carries out its functions in such a way as to ensure proper stewardship of public resources.

PCTs will continue to be accountable to their health authority by means of an annual accountability agreement which sets out agreed aims and targets for improving health, health services and value for money.

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NHS Recruitment

Mr. Gareth R. Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many applications there were to train as a (a) general practitioner, (b) social worker, (c) physiotherapist and (d) special therapist in (i) London and (ii) England and Wales in each year since 1996. [1113]

Mr. Hutton: Consistent data for the number of applicants to train as a general practitioner in England have been collected only this year.

In 2001 the number of applications from GP registrars to begin training in August was 2,239. There were 539 applications to the North and South Thames deaneries which cover London.

Data for the number of social workers are not collected centrally.

Data for the number of physiotherapists are collected by the University and Colleges Admissions Service for the whole of the United Kingdom. Data for London are not available separately.

YearNumber of applications
199728,534
199827,985
199926,316
200025,025

Specialist therapists are not a recognised staff group.


Northwick Park Hospital

Mr. Gareth R. Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) hospital medical staff, (b) consultants and (c) nursing and midwifery staff were employed at Northwick Park hospital in each year since 1996. [1110]

Mr. Hutton: The information is not collected in the format requested. Information by National Health Service trust is provided in the table.

NHS hospital and community health services (HCHS): Nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff, hospital medical staff and consultants at Northwick Park NHS Trust, Central Middlesex Hospital NHS Trust and North West London Hospitals NHS Trust as at 30 September each year
Whole-time equivalents

All hospital medical staffConsultantsTotal nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff, of which:Qualified staffUnqualified staff
19964101301,3201,160160
Northwick Park2508082073090
Central Middlesex hospital1605050043070
19974301401,2101,13080
Northwick Park2708077073050
Central Middlesex hospital1606044041030
19984301501,2501,150100
Northwick Park2809077074030
Central Middlesex hospital1506048041060
1999
NW London Hospitals4601501,2101,12090
2000
NW London Hospitals4701601,2501,140110

NHS hospital and community health services (HCHS): Nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff, hospital medical staff and consultants at Northwick Park NHS Trust, Central Middlesex Hospital NHS Trust and North West London Hospitals NHS Trust as at 30 September each year

Headcount
All hospital medical staffConsultantsTotal nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff, of which:Qualified staffUnqualified staff
19965001701,6101,350260
Northwick Park290901,040860170
Central Middlesex hospital2108057048090
19975001701,5301,360170
Northwick Park300901,030900140
Central Middlesex hospital2008049046040
19985101801,5601,370180
Northwick Park3201001,00091090
Central Middlesex hospital1908055046090
1999
NW London Hospitals5301701,5601,340210
2000
NW London Hospitals5401801,7001,430280

Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10

2. Figures exclude learners and agency staff

3. Due to rounding totals may not equal the sum of component parts

4. In 1999 Northwick Park NHS Trust merged with Central Middlesex Hospitals NHS Trust to form North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

Source:

Department of Health non-medical workforce census

Department of Health medical and dental workforce census


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NHS Consultants (Income Disclosure)

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what disclosure he requires from consultants employed by the National Health Service of those consultants' income from private medical practice. [1422]

Mr. Hutton: At the end of each financial year, whole-time consultants are asked to submit a return to their National Health Service employer, indicating that their annual gross income from private practice has not exceeded 10 per cent. of their gross NHS salary. An employer may require fully audited accounts if they consider that they have grounds for seeking more information. Consultants on other types of contract are not required to disclose their private practice earnings to their NHS employer.

NHS Staff Numbers

Mr. Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many nurses left service in the NHS in the last two years. [1609]

Mr. Hutton: The information requested is not available centrally.


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