Select Committee on Culture, Media and Sport Appendices to the Minutes of Evidence


APPENDIX 2

Memorandum submitted by The Lottery Promotion Company Limited

  Our position remains unchanged as stated in the Minutes of Evidence taken in May 1999 before the Culture, Media and Sport Committee in the memorandum[1] submitted by the Council for the Advancement of Arts, Recreation and Education (CAARE). The only changes since that time are:

  1.  (a)  The "50 per cent of funds spent" has now risen to 65.4 per cent as of 12 September 2000. This figure may represent an improvement, but it is still far too low after six years operation.

    (b)  The residue, known as the balance available, is still £3,264 million. The average reserve fund from January 1998 to August 2000 has been £3,580 million[2]. The minimum reserve float necessary to pay all commitments between February 1998 and August 2000 has been £407 million. This means that the average excess reserve float over this period has been £3,178 million, a figure which we have maintained consistently should be invested in the National Endowment for Sports and Arts (NESA).

    (c)  The Government has announced a major increase in funding to health, from its current £53 billion to become £68 billion, virtually eliminating the need to rob the seriously underfunded lottery sports and arts for this purpose. The July 2000 UNESCO figures[3] show a disparity with the rest of the world, in particular European countries. Where per capita expenditure is up to 24 times the UK figure.

  We continue to feel strongly that the points we listed last year are still outstanding and valid today.

APPENDIX 1: CAARE SUBMISSION TO CULTURE SELECT COMMITTEE, MAY 1999 (NOT PRINTED)

APPENDIX 2 (NOT PRINTED):

    (A)  INCOME TO AND EXPENDITURE FROM THE NATIONAL LOTTERY SINCE JANUARY 1998

    (B)  NATIONAL LOTTERY DISTRIBUTION FUND REVENUE, 31 AUGUST 2000

    (C)  ANALYSIS OF LOTTERY MONEY BY DISTRIBUTING BODY (ALL DCMS 15 SEPTEMBER 2000)

THE DRAW DOWN FIGURES INCLUDE ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS, DETAIL TO BE SPECIFIED BY THE DCMS.

2.  The Selection of a New Operator

  Should be achieved with a greatly simplified invitation to apply (ITA), based firmly on the written advice of the world authorities we referred to in our previous submission. Reference to the complicated bidding process for the first term, or the recent ITA should be minimal. This new ITA should specify the immediate repayment of start-up costs, and should not require an expensive presentation of target figures which may never be met. Instead it should require demonstration of the proven efficacy of the applicant in running lotteries with no decline in sales. The applicant should be encouraged to utilise as many members of the current Camelot team as is practicable, to benefit from their UK experience.

  The overriding objective is to select a service company which can take over an existing lottery with the maximum security, and achieve a constant increase in sales, as happens worldwide. Several precautionary measures which have not been included to date should be added, such as the technical control of the accuracy of the equipment. This safeguard should also be monitored by the NLC to remove their dependence on the operator's report about such details. Clear and comprehensive accounting details should be available to the commissioners at any moment. A terminal giving the NLC direct contact with the main-frame computer is advisable.

  The fundamental question of the repayment of start-up costs has been constantly put to one side. Appendix 3 contains a written question on the subject by Rt Hon Mo Mowlam, MP, when she was Shadow Minister for the DNH, in which her test has been changed from "any of the bids" to "which of the bids", making an answer impossible. Her "as is the international practice" was deleted. Such changes are disturbing for their lack of objectivity. The EDM 946, 24 March 1994, was drafted by Sir Ivan Lawrence and was submitted recently (again) to the National Audit Office, this time by Austin Mitchell, MP. Its points are still valid.

  APPENDIX 3 (NOT PRINTED). LETTER TO FINANCIAL TIMES, 5 JANUARY 1994

  EDM 946, MARCH 1994.

  LETTER TO THE NEW STATESMAN, 15 NOVEMBER 1999

  LETTER TO THE INDEPENDENT 30 SEPTEMBER 2000

3.  Methods of sale of Lottery Tickets and the Structure of Lottery Prizes

  In our opinion this whole topic would have to be discussed in far greater detail than this opportunity allows. Clearly the LPC has many ideas over the years in this connection, (and more are mentioned hereunder) which should be reviewed in consultation with world lottery experts with whom we have close contact. The experience with Camelot suggests that a wider appraisal of international lottery performance and achievement in other markets is necessary to ensure that satisfactory results are obtained in the UK.

  The perusal of the following lists of international sales gives the stark comparisons. The UK lottery, with a population of 59 million achieved a total revenue of $8 billion, whereas the New York Lottery, with a population of 18 million, brought in $3.7 billion. Lottomatica in Italy, which is currently leading world sales with $10.3 billion, is based on a population of 56.6 million.


APPENDIX 4:  (A) TOP 30 GROSSING LOTTERIES WORLDWIDE (B) ANALYSIS INCLUDING UK, NEW YORK, GEORGIA, FLORIDA, MASSACHUSETTS, TEXAS LOTTERIES LA FLEUR'S MAGAZINE, OCTOBER 2000 (NOT PRINTED)

4.  The Role of the National Lottery Commission

  This role [4] should be expanded to cover the distribution, in order to ensure the fulfilment of its responsibility to maximise the funds going to the good causes. The constant stream of intensive negative publicity which the Lottery has attracted for some years, particularly in the case of the Dome, dissuades many people from playing the Lottery, as the following international examples will illustrate. Whereas it is difficult to prove that people will play the Lottery for a good cause, it is easy to show that non-players will refrain from playing, because of its tarnished image. Also many players stop buying tickets as a gesture of dissatisfaction with the operator's misuse or non-use of their money, even when the operator himself is not at fault.

  In March 1998, we passed on to Treasury and the DCMS a report about the New York Lottery, a long-established organisation since 1967. It doubled its sales over the five years from 1992 to 1997, by carefully shaping its image. Sales of $2 billion were transformed to $4 billion at an annual growth rate of 14 per cent. This countered all the stories about the public tiring, the need for novelty, and other justifications for falling sales.[5] The NY Lottery "undertook changes designed to refocus energies on its raison d'etre: raising funds for the public good." "I'm very proud of having almost $4 billion in sales, but I'm more proud of the fact that we have been able to make this a more responsible Lottery" said the Lottery Director, Jeff Perlee. He warned that lotteries which concentrate on the bottom line to the exclusion of the main goal—raising money for the benefit of others—risk a backlash by the general public.

  "If we lose sight of our responsibilities, we'll find ourselves getting slapped real hard by the press and the public, like those lotteries that started thinking they were businesses and forgot they answer to a higher boss, which is public opinion", he said ". . . the on-line game remains New York's flagship product. The game has remained healthy here, in part, because the Lottery has been afraid to tinker with it in order to keep it fresh. Though it takes longer to develop a new on-line game than a new instant product, Perlee still sees the on-line system as a very efficient way to deliver the goods."

  A recent international study[6] underlines these points:

    (i)  Georgia: "Targeted contributions are good for all involved . . . a plan that has made the Georgia Lottery one of the most successful in North America"

    (ii)  Minnesota (past president NASPL): "Specific designated beneficiaries for lottery proceeds are very beneficial both to the image and the sales of a lottery. A significant minority of players plays without a real expectation of winning, and yet with the knowledge that their money nevertheless goes to a good cause."

    (iii)  Maryland: "There are also fence-sitters, for whom the support of a good cause might be enough to turn them into lottery players. Even more important are the non-lottery players—if they feel good about the revenues a lottery generates, they and their elected representatives will support the lottery."

    (iv)  New York State Lottery: "The one thing I don't think anyone can argue about is that when the image of the lottery is of a good corporate citizen and good community participant, everybody feels a little better when they buy a ticket."

    (v)  Western Australia: "While awareness of community benefits is not a strong motivator to play lottery games, it is important in rationalising a loss. While, therefore, it is not the primary reason our players choose to play, it is an important reason why they continue to play."

  Hence the Commission should conduct a monthly investigation of sales in relation to image, and a detailed study of the effectiveness of various styles of promotion. The means of stimulating participation in arts and sports, which we see an integral part of the Lottery's image, must be co-ordinated with a delicacy which is at no time identifiable as a "do-good" image, with paternalistic and nannying overtones. As well as capitalising on sporting heroics in events like the Olympics, the media could be utilised to promote artistic and more personal sporting and exercise activities.

  A start will have been made when it becomes a commonplace to see popular characters in soap operas painting, acting, carving or playing the "cello". Poets are also rarities.

  The Commission should also extend its financial scope to monitor the extent to which Treasury gains from its work, not in the simple calculations of taxes, but in the sports/arts multipliers which its operation is prompting. We expected the DCMS to measure this increase of actual funds to the Treasury as soon as the Lottery began operation. However, no control has been taken, except the reduction of state funds to the DCMS at almost the same rate that the Lottery funds increased. Allowing accountants in the Treasury and newspaper moguls to dictate the emotional climate of the country is a mistake which politicians have not yet learned to correct. The only influences generally available in a non-cultural society, as described by Richard Williams in The Guardian[7] are the result.

  He writes ". . . the fastest route to that good time involves getting drunk. Nothing in their cultural experience, which is to say nothing they see, hear or read in the overheated and hypersexualised mass media, in the tabloid exposés and prying docusoaps and double-entendre ads, offers anything different."


  Jason Cowley, in the New Statesman[8] writes: "But weekend nightlife in our market towns isn't really a laughing matter any more, is it? The Government understands that, but seems at an embarrassing loss as to what to do about it, in any event, how can New Labour legislate against people having fun, even if the idea of fun seems to be no more than an expression of the spiritual emptiness and nihilism that characterises our age of plenty?"

APPENDIX 5, ARTICLES BY JASON COWLEY, NEW STATESMAN, 10 JULY 2000 AND RICHARD WILLIAMS, THE GUARDIAN, 12 AUGUST 2000 (NOT PRINTED)

5.  The Enforcement of the age limit for purchase of Lottery tickets

  This enforcement is difficult to assess. The best method of policing ticket sales is that demonstrated by a good publican, "take care that no excess takes place as a result of the sales he/she makes, and observe the age limit as far as possible."

6.  The promotion and public image of the National Lottery[9]

  Our plan for a National Endowment for Sport and Arts, (NESA), funded predominantly by the Lottery, is built around a social structure to improve the lives of all participants, by creating an appetite for constructive leisure pursuits for all, from the age of seven onwards. Recent studies of the widespread lack of culture, and its effect on the young people of the country, underline that a pattern of habits needs to be established, which is based on inspiration and stimulation. Only enthusiastic coaches and teachers can bring that about, often on the back of well publicised role models. Our coaching plan, put together with the help of the Youth Sports Trust and similar organisations for the arts sets out to bring this to everyone, starting with initial teacher training (ITT), namely creating a desire and capacity in the teachers to impart these feelings.

  The praise for the Lottery from recent British Olympic winners, who attributed their success to Lottery funding sends a powerful message. Yet this is still inspiring the channelled enthusiasm of only a small number of individuals. To generate similar enthusiasm in the substantial majority, who often have less self esteem, is the long-term challenge of promoting the Lottery.

  Other antidotes to the drunkenness problem which the Lottery promotion can advance include witty advertising about self-image. Drunkenness is never seen in Italy and rarely in France, despite considerable consumption of alcohol. Italian mothers inculcate into their children, without exemption, that they must always look their best. This key to self esteem is invaluable, and later becomes a profound influence in choice of style.


7.  The impact of the National Lottery upon charities and charitable giving

  This impact is considerably different to the views generally expressed. When Lord Birkett first argued for the Lottery in the House of Lords, he illustrated the case for concentrating on arts and sports because of the general trend of charitable spending. Of a total expenditure in 1992 of £1 billion 458 million in the top 400 charities, 33 per cent went to medicine and health, 24 per cent to general welfare, 22 per cent to international aid, 6 per cent to animal protection, but only 2 per cent on culture, incorporating arts/recreation, youth and education.

  By 1998 these proportions had changed little, but the overall expenditure on charities, despite fears that the Lottery would eclipse charitable donations, had almost doubled to £2 billion 626 million. Medicine and health rose to 35 per cent, general welfare 26 per cent whereas international aid fell to 17 per cent. Animal protection had risen to 8 per cent, but culture was still at the bottom of the list although now 5 per cent.

  Our plan to bring the Lottery back to the shape outlined by the Rothschild Royal Commission in 1978—for it to function principally as a charitable foundation, therefore channelling its funds through the NLCB—sits perfectly within this overall structure. The £138 million which went to cultural causes through charitable routes in 1998[10] could be tripled at least by NESA. It would not disadvantage the other popular charitable areas, but must be seen in the overall picture of government policy. The government plan to increase the already huge NHS budget a further £15 billion to £68 billion means that any lottery money spent on this will pale into insignificance.[11] Money on specialist medical equipment helps so few people in comparison to the number which play the Lottery that the spread of manna is quite disproportionate.

APPENDIX 6.  INCOME OF CHARITABLE ORGANISATIONS BY SECTOR (NOT PRINTED)

8.  The impact of the National Lottery upon the betting and gaming industry

  This wealthy industry, like medicine, has a great deal of money for lobbying, which it does well. Only if the Lottery is run as a strict charity, with no wastage of money on bureaucratic delays, unnecessary profit, wasted good causes, and uncentred purposes, can it claim special advantages. If it were to become such a charity, going against all the Treasury principles of non-hypothecation of funds, the need to eliminate drunkenness from the UK, to transform yobboism into positive, stylish and well-informed behaviour could be seen as a reason which touches the whole populace—not only the Lottery players.

  Once that decision is made and firmly adopted, and the Lottery becomes a genuine charitable raffle for good causes, then taxing the other forms of profit-making gambling is quite in order. They can no longer claim all the privileges they have gained, through the lax policing of the purposes and use of the Lottery.

  The Secretary of State has equal and separate responsibility parallel to the Commissioners to maximise funds to the good causes. He has much more power than them[12] to improve the image and earning power of the Lottery. He can also appeal to Treasury with the convincing arguments for the next point—taxation.

APPENDIX 7.  AGENDA DISCUSSED WITH RT HON CHRIS SMITH, JUNE 2000 (NOT PRINTED)

9.  The taxation of the National Lottery

  In October 1996 we published an important book by the economist Barry Bracewell-Milnes A Pool of Resources. He examined in some detail the ramifications of the Lottery and, above all, of investment in its various beneficiaries. He found that arts and sports had by far the most marked economic multipliers. This means that investment in this area brings returns to the Treasury through taxes related to ancillary activities, whether travel, eating, sports apparel, theatre tickets or hotels, and illustrates that the more money invested in these areas, the greater the Treasury gains. He recommended a graded reduction of the tax, but the latest international comparisons of cultural expenditure suggest that a vigorous government may wish to make this total.

  What is mentioned, but not calculated in great detail by Bracewell-Milnes, is how much the Treasury saves by the negative costs which this investment helps avoid. The cost of keeping one delinquent in prison is many more times that of providing the same person with sustained activity for their leisure time. Yet that is only looking at the picture financially. The wider costs of negative behaviour and inactivity include absenteeism, ill health, unproductiveness, violence and drugs.

  A long report by the IFO Institute in Germany, details the extent to which the arts virtually pay for themselves. The report examined the UNESCO findings on cultural spending (in which the UK currently figures as spending one twenty-fourth of the total of either Germany or France) and illustrates graphically just how these arts multipliers have allowed a huge cultural industry to function for many decades. The vast investment in culture in Bavaria, for instance, has helped Munich achieve pre-eminence in the study and production of the visual arts and its per capita expenditure on music is unrivalled. Were London to enjoy an equal investment, it would have ten opera houses and twenty-one orchestras. Inevitably certain pursuits are seen in Britain as élitist, if since World War II the national spend in this area has been derisory—virtually non-existent in the eyes of UNESCO.

  As a result of these figures being shown to Cabinet ministers, in the wake of thoughtful articles[13] about the total absence of culture for all young people the Foreign Office supported a major increase in funding to arts and sports at Cabinet level. However their letter[14] indicated that the initiative for this must come from the DCMS. The Foreign Office has to cope with looking after all the cases of drunken and violent behaviour abroad, and so have a clear picture of the extent to which the British have earned themselves the title of "the barbarians of Europe". Heath's cartoon[15], after England's exit from the World Cup, depicted a yobbo whose chest was tattooed with "I am a victim of successive governments' educational policies".

  We have now invited all the local authorities to support this cry for a major increase in the funding of culture. In view of the Foreign Office's positive response, we suggest that all taxation on the Lottery should be suspended, and the 12 per cent (plus 1 per cent if Camelot continue) money saved is redirected to NESA.

APPENDIX 8. CULTURAL SECTOR SPENDING AS A PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL PUBLIC SECTOR EXPENDITURE. UNESCO AS OF 10 JULY 2000 (NOT PRINTED)

APPENDIX 9. HEATH CARTOON, SPECTATOR 24 JUNE, 2000 (NOT PRINTED).

10.  The operation of the National Lottery Distribution Fund

  Our board is deeply gratified at the large number of projects in many fields which has been successfully brought into existence as a result of the National Lottery. When we formed the company in 1990, we had a vision of the progress as bringing a transformation to the quality of life in Britain. But we could not have anticipated the ruthless way in which the Treasury would annul the overall increase to the funding of culture, by reducing its payments to the DCMS which were 0.16 per cent of State expenditure in 1993, reduced to 0.1 per cent in 1999. Moreover, despite the £9.8 billion which the NLDF has received from the Lottery in six years, of which £3.264 is still in the kitty, some of the money has been distributed both slowly and aimlessly. The National Heritage Memorial Fund had to appeal through The Spectator for ideas on how to spend its money. The Millennium Commission appealed only recently for ideas on how to spend £100 million which it had in a special reserve account.

  In June we received a correction from the DCMS[16] of the way in which we title our summary of NLDF funds. Whether money is "committed" or "awarded", from the banking point of view it has not been spent until it is "drawn down". Total administration costs amounted to £420 million at the end of the last quarter. We hope to have this itemised for each beneficiary soon. The news that £250,000 legal fees for the case brought by Camelot against the NLC is to be paid out of the Lottery is as shocking as the other sustained delays in actual payment.

APPENDIX 10. LETTER FROM DCMS RE DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS DECLINING TO MAKE CENTRAL FIGURES AVAILABLE (NOT PRINTED)

  Whereas the operator was challenged with a fine of £1 million for every day in which they were behind schedule, no such challenge was made to the NLDF.

  Most municipal authorities know that if their annual funds have not been used up by the end of the year, they will be reduced the following year. But the NLDF figures which we have reproduced monthly since 1997 show that the reserve has remained at an average of £3.5 billion for almost three years. The Treasury predicted[17] a reserve which would peak in 1996-97 at only £1.5 billion and fall to £986 million by 2001. The firm assurance that all this money is "committed" comes from a wide range of officials[18] who feel they are under no pressure whatsoever to protect the image of the Lottery as an organisation which truly reaches out to all its players.

APPENDIX 11.  TREASURY PREDICTIONS, 12 MARCH, 1996 WITH GRAPH. LETTER FROM TREASURY 19 MARCH, 1998 PREDICTING USE OF THE £3.4 BILLION (NOT PRINTED)

  Lord Gowrie named Lord Burns as "the unsung villain of the Lottery". That suggests that the Treasury designed this delay in distribution, and presumably rejoices in it. Our national problem of drunkenness, violence and the like has been fuelled partly by the Treasury's resistance to funding the whole area of leisure activity since the Second World War. Without doubt the quickest way to start to remedy this state of affairs is to re-arrange the distribution of the Lottery money.

  The New Opportunities Fund (NOF) has been so lax in its payments, as "Newsnight" demonstrated recently, that promises and commitments made 18 months and two years ago have not matured. Sports organisations have described how joint ventures have had to be abandoned because of the tardiness of the NOF in keeping its side of the arrangements. On the other hand, the recent DCMS publication "A Sporting Future for All" spells out a heartening summary of where we should go. Appendix 12 is a summary of our reactions to its various proposals, based on the general plan of multiplying its target by five, and reducing the time for its improvements to five instead of ten years.

APPENDIX 12.  SUMMARY OF DCMS A SPORTING FUTURE FOR ALL. CAARE'S COMMENTS ON THE DOCUMENT (NOT PRINTED)

  The bewildering range of Lottery beneficiaries, the plurality of purposes and methods within them, and the lethargy of the actual distribution are the result of a lack of central strategy and urgency in the whole enterprise. Some very fine achievements have been made, and a number of invaluable advances obtained in areas which were hitherto undeveloped. But the aim of touching all ten million people—almost 20 per cent of the population—between the ages of seven and twenty-one is not a guideline which the various beneficiaries follow.

  The habit of announcing a small advance in a myriad of areas is Whitehall's way of keeping abreast and quieting the lobbying, of ticking off one request after another, of "putting out fires". It provides positive publicity, but achieves nothing significant in national terms. The reallocation of funds which we have proposed for some years, and perfected with the help of the Arts and Sports Councils, leads to 45 per cent of the Lottery funds overall going to sport and 35 per cent to the arts. The detail is given in our book "The Fifth Year" "Distributing the Lottery to Everyone" (by Richard McGowan, Jul-Nov 1998), and the CAARE paper "Endowment, the Future with a Foundation" (July 1999).

  The ideal division to help achieve a single, saleable image for the Lottery, without recourse to a change in the law, is to limit all other beneficiaries to five per cent as the law requires. Thus, after the closure of the Millennium Commission, the Arts and Sports Councils receive 12.5 per cent each, and the rest is in NESA. The quicker it grows, the greater the effect of the Lottery on the populace. The effect would be as follows:

Charities

  After six years, the charities have spent 69 per cent of their available funds[19]. Our re-division makes charity the largest beneficiary, retaining five per cent of the total available for "other" charities, but adding some 60 per cent for the focused charity, NESA. That means the NLCB receives 65 per cent in all.

Education

  The New Opportunities Fund has spent 50 per cent of its available funds. Reducing its income to only five per cent of the whole, the rest is transferred to NESA, which provides education for all, and in particular the 10 million people between the ages of seven and 21. As is proper, the DCMS is thus funding education in its own subjects, because that is where the national lack is greatest, as the UNESCO study indicates.

  The letters from David Blunkett and Mo Mowlam[20] reflect the official reaction to these changes—naming positive reports, on which little or no action has been taken. Economists who have worked not only on the Ken Robinson report but also for the Arts Council are of the opinion that these reports are being largely ignored. Our own requests to discuss the problems of education, both physical and of the emotions with the DfEE have been turned down[21]. But the Education Sub-committee is open to examining the spiritual dimensions of education in its broadest sense.[22] With a Prime Minister declaring that he wishes to touch the soul of the country, these studies are fundamental. "Emotional" education is virtually unknown as a concept, yet people who are emotionally balanced lead the happiest and most productive lives.

Millennium Commission

  With all its major expenses passed, it has still spent only 74 per cent of its available cash. Reducing its income to 5 per cent of the whole until its final bills have been paid and then transferring its share of funds to the Arts and Sports Councils gives a balance of 12.5 per cent to these councils. This allows a final total of 25 per cent to the Arts and Sports Councils combined, 60 per cent to NESA, the remaining 5 per cent divisions going to "other" charities, heritage and the NOF.

  Just as the NOF claimed its funds retroactively, we suggest that these proportions should be calculated from the beginning of the Lottery, November 1994. This would allow the bulk of the idle funds to be invested immediately in the endowment plan, and the first steps to be taken, before the end of this year, in constructing the teacher network, the initial teacher training, and other important details.

  Once the Lottery is shaped in this way, the structured promotion of the Lottery can start, on the lines advised by the New York Lottery Director who doubled their sales. That would give Camelot a year to show how good they are at focusing on the purposes of the Lottery, while everyone's eyes are on it.

APPENDIX 13.   LETTERS TO THE PRIME MINISTER ABOUT DRUNKENNESS, AND FROM THE FOREIGN OFFICE, HOME OFFICE, DAVID BLUNKETT AND MO MOWLAM (NOT PRINTED)

APPENDIX 14.  LETTER FROM EDUCATION SUB COMMITTEE. LETTER TO AND FROM DFEE ABOUT PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL EDUCATION (NOT PRINTED)

APPENDIX 15.  LETTER FROM CAARE TO SIR ANDREW TURNBULL, HM TREASURY, 7 SEPTEMBER 2000 (NOT PRINTED)

  It must be remembered that all commitments whose demands for cash have matured during the last three years have been paid out of Lottery income[23]. If that income can now be properly accelerated with a new, positive image, delays on former commitments should be minimal. The main purpose of centring, the Lottery funds on advancing culture for all ages of seven to 21 is essential to save the Lottery and regenerate its sales. So all dissident voices, who carry on singing to the old tune "Gimme, Gimme, Gimme" must be shamed into collaboration for a larger cause, and a greater income.

  There is no-one in the land safe from being mugged. The reasons for this common danger are multiple, but the first and most available cure lies under our noses. The Treasury may respond quickly and positively to the clarion call for it to multiply state funds in this area. But once the will to catch up with the Foreign Office view of the future is identified in the whole Cabinet, the necessary changes, including those outside the Lottery jurisdiction can be pushed through.

October 2000


1   Appendix 9 to the Minutes of Evidence taken before the Culture, Media and Sport Committee. Back

2   See Appendix 2 (not printed). Back

3   See Appendix 6 (not printed). Back

4   See Appendix 1, points 6, 7, 8, 13 (not printed). Back

5   See IGWB Lottery, P 47 et seq, March 1998. Back

6   Lottery Business, IGWB, September 2000. Back

7   See Appendix 5 (not printed). Back

8   See Appendix 5(not printed). Back

9   See Appendix 1, Par. 8, 11, 12 (not printed). Back

10   See Appendix 6, Income of charitable organisations by sector, Charities Aid Foundation 2000 (not printed). Back

11   See also Appendix 1, Par. 12 (not printed). Back

12   See Appendix 7, Agenda discussed with Rt Hon Chris Smith, 26 June 2000 (not printed). Back

13   See Appendix 5 (not printed). Back

14   See Appendix 13 (not printed). Back

15   See Appendix 9 (not printed). Back

16   See Appendix 10 (not printed). Back

17   See Appendix 11 (not printed). Back

18   See Appendix 11 (not printed). Back

19   See Appendix 2 (not printed). Back

20   See Appendix 13 (not printed). Back

21   See Appendix 14 (not printed). Back

22   See Appendix 14 (not printed). Back

23   See Appendix 2 (not printed). Back


 
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