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West Mercia Constabulary (Shrewsbury Division)

Mr. Paul Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the capital improvement projects in the Shrewsbury Division of West Mercia Constabulary since May 1997; and if he will make a statement. [160512]

Mr. Charles Clarke [holding answer 9 May 2001]: Most capital projects are entirely a matter for police authorities and forces. The Chief Constable of West Mercia

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Constabulary informs me that capital improvements in the Shrewsbury Division have been as follows:

YearProject
1997Alteration of Police House to create the new Pontesbury Police Station
1999New Build--Bishop's Castle Police Station
1999Alteration of Police House to create the new Craven Arms Police Station
2000 to dateCreation of an open plan Intelligence Cell from cellular offices, Shrewsbury Divisional Head Quarters
2000 to dateNew Build--Ludlow Police Station

Home Detention Curfew Scheme

Miss Widdecombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list, for the period between the commencement of the home detention curfew scheme and 30 April inclusive (a) the number of prisoners released on the scheme, (b) the number of prisoners convicted of each offence who were released on the scheme, with a breakdown of the offences committed, including offences committed by prisoners normally classified under the categories (i) other homicide and attempted homicide, (ii) other violence against the person, (iii) drug offences, (iv) assaults and (v) other offences, including a breakdown of the prisoners normally classified in the sub-category of other offences called other offences, (c) the average sentence (i) received and (ii) served, and the average period spent on the scheme, in respect of each offence, (d) the number of prisoners released on the scheme, with a breakdown of the offences committed, who (i) breached the conditions of the curfew, (ii) disappeared and were recaptured, (iii) disappeared and remain unlawfully at large and (iv) had their licences revoked with reasons, (e) a breakdown of the specific offences committed by prisoners released on the scheme while on the scheme, including offences committed, by prisoners who committed more than one offence and (f) a breakdown of the specific offences committed by prisoners released on the scheme who committed a further offence while on the scheme that was similar in character to that for which they were originally convicted, including offences committed by prisoners who committed more than one offence; and if he will make a statement. [159869]

Mr. Boateng [holding answer 1 May 2001]: I have written to the right hon. Member and placed a copy of the letter in the Library.

Imprisonment Rates

Mr. Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the imprisonment rate was as a percentage of crimes committed for (a) the United Kingdom and (b) other European countries in the latest year for which information is available. [160971]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The latest available information on the attrition rate in England and Wales was published in December 1999 in "Digest 4: Information on the criminal justice system in England & Wales". This indicates that, for the offences of criminal damage, theft of a motor vehicle, theft from a motor vehicle (including

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attempts), bicycle theft, domestic burglary, wounding, robbery/theft from the person, 0.3 per cent. of the offences committed in 1997 resulted in a custodial sentence.

Similar information is not available for other European countries. However, information based on a survey conducted by the Council of Europe on the percentage of persons convicted who received custodial sentences for certain offences was published in February last year in the Statistical Bulletin 04/00, "International comparisons of criminal justice statistics 1998".

Copies of both these documents are available in the Library.

Working Time Directive

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of senior civil servants in his Department have signed waivers to work voluntarily more than 48 hours a week; and if he will make a statement. [160884]

Mr. Straw: Less than 4 per cent. of senior civil servants in my Department have signed such waivers. The standard terms and conditions of service for staff employed by the Home Office are well within the limits set by the Working Time Regulations.

Severe Personality Disorders

Dr. Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funds his Department has allocated to the pilot assessment projects for those with dangerous and severe personality disorder for the years 1999-2000 to 2001-02. [160637]

Mr. Boateng: Money allocated to fund dangerous and severe personality disorder (DSPD) pilot projects--for assessment and treatment--for those who are dangerous and severely personality disordered is as follows:

YearSpent (£)
1999-20000
2000-01554,353

Following the Spending Review 2000, substantial capital and current funds have been allocated in the both the Home Office and the Department of Health for the development of further pilot projects. For 2001-02 the Home Office allocation is:



Police (Injuries)

Mr. Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many police officers have received firearms injuries while on duty in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement; [160805]

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Mr. Charles Clarke: The Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate collates statistics of notifiable offences recorded by the police, in which police officers on duty are injured by a firearm. The table records numbers of incidents in England and Wales since 1989. Data for 2000-01 are not yet available.

No distinction is made regarding how the firearm was used in causing the injury, who caused the injury, or whether it was incurred on duty or in training.

Notifiable offences recorded by the police in which a police officer on duty was injured by a firearm

England and WalesNumber of offences
Fatal injurySerious injury(28)Slight injuryTotal
198912811
19901225
1991--527
1992(29)13610
199313610
1994--12921
199519515
1996--459
1997--246
1997-98--336
1998-99----1111
1999-2000----1010

(28) A serious injury is one which necessitated detention in hospital or involved fractures, concussion, severe general shock, penetration by a bullet or multiple shot wounds.

(29) Special constable.


Police firearms officers undertake rigorous training and their use of firearms is governed by ACPO (the Association of Chief Police Officers) guidelines.

Crime Clear-up Rates

Mr. Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average crime clear-up rate was in each of the last 10 years for which figures are available; how many recorded crimes were not cleared up in each year; and if he will make a statement. [160796]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The table shows the clear-up rates for recorded crime in England and Wales since 1990, together with the total number of recorded crimes that were not cleared up in this period.

Recorded crime clear-up (or detection) rate and notifiable offences not cleared up

Percentage clear-up rateNumber of offences not cleared up
1990322,984,209
1991293,595,853
1992263,992,621
1993253,988,955
1994263,706,081
1995263,609,069
1996263,580,686
1997283,202,396
1998-99293,611,970
1999-2000253,964,272

Notes:

1. Offences of Criminal damage £20 and under have been excluded up to 1997; all criminal damage is included thereafter.

2. New guidance was issued in April 1999 that tightened up the conditions under which a crime can be detected. One of its principal features was the removal of post-sentence visits as a method of detection


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