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Teacher Numbers

Mr. Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment how many teachers there were in (a) Nottinghamshire and (b) nationally (i) in May 1997 and (ii) at the latest date for which figures are available. [154462]

Ms Estelle Morris: The full-time equivalent numbers of regular teachers (ie excluding short-term supply teachers) in the maintained schools sector at January 1997 and January 2000 were as follows:

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19972000
Nottinghamshire7,8005,900
City of Nottingham(4)n/a2,100
Nottinghamshire total:7,8008,000
England399,200404,600

(4) Nottinghamshire was split into City of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire in the local Government re-organisation of April 1998.


The number of regular teachers in the maintained schools sector increased by 6,900 between January 1998 and January 2000.

There was a growth of 2,300 in the number of people recruited to train to be teachers between 1999-2000 and 2000-01, the first such increase since 1992-93.

Wandsworth LEA

Mr. Linton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will list the funding allocations, by scheme, to Wandsworth local education authority in each year since 1996; and what his estimates are for the 2001-02 financial year. [154791]

Ms Estelle Morris: I refer my hon. Friend to the letter sent to him by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State on 16 February.

The total funding for Wandsworth local education authority since 1996-97 is set out as follows:

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£ million

1996-971997-981998-991999-20002000-012001-02
SSA86.389.193.798.2101.9106.2
Grants0.83.11.23.28.9(5)11.0
Of which:
Standards Fund(6)0.80.91.22.97.17.7
Class size reduction------0.30.30.3
Education action zones--------0.2(5)0.2
Nursery vouchers--2.2--------
School standards (special grant)--------1.12.0
School budget support grant--------0.2--
Education budget support grant----------0.8
Capital1.20.91.93.57.0N/A

(5) DfEE contributions only. Figures for 2001-02 are provisional.

(6) 2001-02 funding for education action zones not included in letter of 16 February 2001 as amount had not been allocated.


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In the Budget on 7 March, national increases of £100 million for school standards grant and devolved new deal for schools capital were announced. Wandsworth will benefit from these increases; the precise allocations are being calculated, and have not been included in the table above.

Real-terms national recurrent funding per pupil will rise year on year by over £200 in 2001-02 and will have risen by over £500 since 1997-98. There will be an average real-terms increase in per pupil funding of around £750 between 1997-98 and 2003-04.

Education Funding and Teacher Recruitment

(West Sussex)

Mr. Flight: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will make a statement on education funding and teacher recruitment in West Sussex. [154836]

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Ms Estelle Morris: I refer the hon. Gentleman to the letter sent to him by the Secretary of State on 16 February. In the Budget on 7 March, national increases of £100 million for school standards grant and devolved new deal for schools capital were announced. West Sussex will benefit from these increases; the precise allocations are being calculated.

Regarding teacher recruitment, latest figures (January 2000) show the West Sussex teacher vacancy rate as 0.8 per cent. The average for England is also 0.8 per cent. West Sussex will benefit from the Government's existing and planned general measures to improve teacher recruitment and retention, including initiatives resulting from the additional £200 million announced in the Budget.

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Fresh Start Schools (Staff Vacancies)

Mr. Boswell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment how many unfilled vacancies for permanent members of teaching staff there were at each fresh start school on (a) 31 December 2000 and (b) 28 February; and when he expects them to be filled. [155165]

Ms Estelle Morris [holding answer 26 March 2001]: We do not collect this information centrally. However, the Department has provided each of the 25 schools which have undergone a "fresh start" since 1997 with additional funding to support their plans for raising standards. Those fresh start schools which have encountered difficulties over teacher vacancies have been able to use these funds both for supply cover, in the short term, and to offer the recruitment and retention allowances needed to attract and keep permanent teaching staff in the longer term.

Foot and Mouth

Mr. Peter Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will list the meetings and conferences organised by his Department and agencies of his Department which have been (a) cancelled and (b) postponed owing to foot and mouth disease; and if he will make a statement. [155358]

Mr. Wills [holding answer 23 March 2001]: The information is not held centrally and could be collated only at disproportionate cost.

Jewish Schools

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment how many (a) Jewish schools in the UK received public funds and (b) Jewish schools there were in the UK, in each of the last five years. [155618]

Ms Estelle Morris: The total number of Jewish schools and the number which received public funds as maintained schools in England as at 1 January in the last five years are as follows:

Total number of Jewish schoolsNumber of maintained Jewish schools
19977026
19987227
19997428
20007831
2001(7)7832

(7) Provisional


Information about Jewish schools in the rest of the UK can be obtained from the Scottish Executive, the National Assembly for Wales and the Northern Ireland Assembly.

SOLICITOR-GENERAL

Departmental Policies (Chichester)

Mr. Martyn Jones: To ask the Solicitor-General if he will set out, with statistical information relating as directly as possible to the Chichester constituency, the effects on Chichester of his Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [155283]

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The Solicitor-General: In October 1999, in line with national policy, the Chichester office of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), in liaison with a number of other criminal justice agencies including courts, police and local lawyers, introduced procedures based upon the Narey proposals. All defendants charged with a criminal offence where a guilty plea is anticipated now make their first appearance before the magistrates within five working days. All other cases appear in court within 48 hours.

In April 2000, the CPS at Chichester changed its structure in line with the proposals of the Glidewell review. As a first step towards a trial unit, it established a Crown Court Committal unit. This enables the Crown Prosecution Service to place greater emphasis on serious crime cases, which are heard at both Chichester and Lewes Crown courts.

The Chichester office also has fast track procedures in place to deal with Persistent Young Offender cases heard at Crown courts and Youth courts. CPS Sussex recorded the best improvement overall in the country in terms of the time taken to bring persistent young offenders to court. The average time taken was reduced from 144 days to 84 days. CPS Sussex is working continually towards the Government's 71-day target. All these changes illustrate the Government's successful policy of speeding up the criminal justice system.

The Chichester office is also involved in the Direct Communication with Victims initiative. This provides a written explanation when the CPS either discontinues or substantially alters a charge in the Crown court cases within the initiative. In some circumstances the CPS will meet with victims to explain why a decision was taken.

The Chichester office deals with a broad range of work, including murders. One such case made legal history with the conviction of a man for murder where the victim died more than a year and a day after the assault. Using the Law Reform (Year and a day Rule) Act 1996, and with the consent of the Attorney-General, a prosecution for murder was instituted and the defendant convicted. The case was an important decision as it was one of the first occasions when a defendant, who had been previously convicted of an assault before the victim died, was later tried again in respect of the same conduct and convicted of murder.

Actions and policies of the Treasury Solicitor's Department and the Serious Fraud Office do not directly affect the Chichester constituency.


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