18 Dec 2000 : Column: 1W

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 18 December 2000

ENVIRONMENT, TRANSPORT AND THE REGIONS

Waste

Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions how much waste was imported for use in cement kilns in each of the last 10 years. [142262]

Mr. Meacher: The estimated quantity of hazardous waste imported into the United Kingdom from 1997 to date for use as fuel in cement and lime kilns is as follows:

Tonnes
19973,580
19982,932
19998,209
20007,150

Final figures for 2000 will not be available until the summer of 2001 since, under European law, the kilns have 180 days following receipt of the waste to provide the UK regulatory authorities with a certificate of recovery confirming the actual quantity of waste used as a fuel.

Accurate information about imports solely for cement kilns, rather than for cement and lime kilns can be provided only at disproportionate cost. Information about waste burnt imported for burning at such facilities before 1997 is not available since the UK regulatory authorities do not hold such data.

Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions what emission standards are applicable to cement kilns and high temperature incineration plants. [142259]

Mr. Meacher: Processes subject to Directives 89/369/EEC and 89/429/EEC on the reduction of air pollution from municipal waste incineration plant, and 94/67/EC on the incineration of hazardous wastes are required to comply with the emission limits set out therein. Other processes subject to Integrated Pollution Control (IPC) are expected to achieve the benchmark emission standards set out in the Environment Agency's published guidance notes in accordance with BATNEEC. Benchmark emission standards for cement works are set out in the Agency's IPC Guidance Note S2 3.01, and for incinerators in Guidance Note S2 5.01. Where hazardous waste is burned in cement kilns, the processes must comply with the terms set out in the Hazardous Waste Incineration Directive. Specific emission limits have been set for each plant and are stated in individual authorisation, which can be obtained from the public registers located at the relevant local Environment Agency or local authority office.

18 Dec 2000 : Column: 2W

Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions if he will amend planning regulations to require a planning application to be submitted when composition of materials to be burnt in cement kilns is modified significantly. [142263]

Ms Beverley Hughes: The modification of the composition of materials to be burnt in cement kilns would not, in itself, constitute a change of use for which planning permission would be needed. We therefore have no intention to amend the planning system to require a planning application in such cases.

Any proposal to burn a modified composition of fuel will, however, require the operator to submit an application for a variation to their authorisation where they are regulated under the Integrated Pollution and control regime. If the variation is significant, the Environment Agency must consult with interests parties prior to its determination.

Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions what tonnage of hazardous waste was disposed of in cement kilns and high temperature incineration plants in each of the last 10 years. [142260]

Mr. Meacher: The estimated quantity of hazardous waste disposed of in cement and lime kilns, and high temperature incinerators from 1997 to date are set out in the table.

Tonnes

Quantity in cement and lime kilnsQuantity in high temperature incinerators
199751,895126,978
1998131,325123,646
1999117,937117,996

Final figures for 2000 will note be available until the summer of 2001 since, under European law, both types of facilities have 180 days following receipt of imported hazardous waste to provide the UK regulatory authorities with a certificate of disposal or recovery confirming the actual quantity of waste handled.

Accurate information about waste disposed of in cement kilns, rather than for cement and lime kilns can be provided only at disproportionate cost. Any information about waste disposed of at these facilities prior to 1997 could be provided only at disproportionate cost, since the UK regulatory authorities are not required to hold data for previous years.

Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (1) if he will list the locations of cement kilns and high temperature incinerators in the UK; [142257]

Mr. Meacher: A list of 15 cement kilns and 64 high temperature incinerators 1 , including three merchant high temperature incinerators, has been placed in the House Library. All of the cement kilns listed have equipment in

18 Dec 2000 : Column: 3W

place for monitoring emissions to air. Reported emissions from each site are publicly available on the Environment Agency's Pollution Inventory for each year since the site was authorised under Integrated Pollution Control. IPC was phased in during the early to mid 1990s. The Pollution Inventory can be accessed on www.environment- agency.gov.uk. Details of emissions prior to authorisation under IPC are not held centrally and can be provided only at disproportionate cost.


Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions if he will list emission limits applicable to plants burning fuel. [142266]

Mr. Meacher: Plant burning fuel which are subject to regulation under Part I of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 are required to use the best available techniques not entailing excessive cost (BATNEEC) for preventing the release of harmful substances; where that is not possible emissions must be minimised and rendered harmless.

Plant burning fuel listed under Chapter 1.3, Part A, of the Environmental Protection (Prescribed Processes and Substances) Regulations SI1991/No.472 are expected to achieve the benchmark emission standards set out in the Environment Agency's published guidance notes in accordance with BATNEEC. Benchmark emission standards for combustion processes are set out in IPC Guidance Note S3 1.01, for combustion plant. Specific emission limits are set for each plant and stated in individual authorisations which can be obtained from the public registers located at the relevant local Environment Agency or local authority office.

Mr. Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions what plans he has to allow the export of hazardous waste from the UK. [142264]

Mr. Meacher: The legally binding UK Management Plan for Exports and Imports of Waste currently prohibits all exports of waste for disposal. This approach is consistent with longstanding UK policy that developed countries should be self-sufficient in waste disposal. Consistent with the UN Basel Convention, exports of hazardous waste for recovery are permitted only to OECD countries and Liechtenstein.

This summer the UK Government went out to consultation on revised UK export and import policies. The consultation paper proposed an exception to the current prohibition on exports for disposal in two tightly defined circumstances:



The consultation paper proposed no change to UK policy on exports of hazardous waste for recovery.

18 Dec 2000 : Column: 4W

The Government are currently considering responses to the consultation exercise.

Houses in Multiple Occupation

Mr. Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions how many deaths there were from (a) carbon monoxide poisoning and (b) fire in houses in multiple occupation in (i) each of the last 20 years in England and (ii) 1980 to 1998 in Wales. [141687]

Mr. Meacher [holding answer 11 December 2000]:

Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning

I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 13 November 2000, Official Report, column 479W which provided information on carbon monoxide poisoning deaths from all fossil-fuelled appliances from 1985-2000, and carbon monoxide poisoning deaths from the supply and use of flammable gas from 1981-2000. These data do not separately identify poisoning deaths in homes in multiple occupation, and it is not therefore possible to provide the additional information requested.

Fire

The information is in the table.

Deaths from fires in multiple occupancy dwellings, England and Wales, 1980-99

YearEngland and WalesEnglandWales
1981192(1)--(1)--
19811911847
19821651623
19831811738
19941581571
19851621602
19861891863
19871681626
19881871816
19891761688
19901671643
19911431349
19921691636
19931181144
19941211192
19951481435
19961541459
19971501446
19981501419
1999(2)1141104

(1) Not available

(2) 1999 Data are provisional

Source:

Home Office, Fire Damage Report Form (FDRI)



Next Section Index Home Page