House of Commons
8th January 2014
Notices of Motions for which no days have been fixed
('Early Day Motions')

*The figure following this symbol is the number of Members who have added their names in support of the Motion, including the Member in charge of the Motion.

After an Early Day Motion (EDM) has been printed for the first time, it is only reprinted when names are added or amendments tabled; only the first six names and any names added since the last printing are included. After the week in which a Motion is first printed and the following week, added names and amendments appear only in a separate paper, Mature EDMs, distributed the next Thursday. In the meantime, they are available for inspection by Members in the Table Office and the Library or on the EDM database at edmi.parliament.uk

883 PROSECUTION OF RAPE IN KENYA 16:12:13
Katy Clark
Jim Shannon
Sir Alan Meale
Sir Peter Bottomley
Mr Mike Hancock
Martin Caton
*21
Jim Dobbin Sammy Wilson Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House condemns the abhorrent actions of the six men who beat and raped a young woman in Kenya leaving her injured and wheelchair-bound; further condemns the behaviour of the Kenyan police who did not punish these criminals and dismissed these atrocious actions as assault, allowing them to return to the woman's family home to taunt their victim; calls for justice to be brought against the rapists and the police in Busia; acknowledges the problem of an epidemic of rape across central Africa and particularly Kenya; further calls for Kenya's General Inspector of Police to take appropriate action against the policemen responsible and to ensure justice is brought; and further acknowledges the legal support being given to the young woman by Kenya's Coalition on Violence Against Women and its work in raising awareness of the issue.

885 20th ANNIVERSARY OF THE DOWNING STREET DECLARATION 16:12:13
Chris Ruane
Mark Durkan
Paul Murphy
Sir Peter Bottomley
Mr Shaun Woodward
Mr Elfyn Llwyd
*51
Dr Alasdair McDonnell Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House celebrates the twentieth anniversary of the Downing Street declaration signed by British Prime Minister, Rt hon. John Major MP, and the Irish Taoiseach, Albert Reynolds TD, on 15 December 1993; believes that the remarkable contribution of these two leaders to developing the path of peace is too frequently overlooked and that the Declaration itself stands as a monument to their shared commitment to overcome the legacy of history, to heal divisions and create a lasting settlement between the peoples of Britain and Ireland; recognises that the Prime Minister's re-affirmation that the British Government has no selfish strategic or economic interest in Northern Ireland, his statement on self-determination and the Government's stated commitment to encourage, facilitate and enable the achievement of agreed structures, played a pivotal role in creating confidence in a process of negotiation to be pursued exclusively by peaceful and democratic means; and urges the Government to be vigilant against threats while continuing to foster agreement and reconciliation encompassing the totality of relationships within Northern Ireland, on the island of Ireland and between Britain and Ireland.

887 NUCLEAR POWER COST 16:12:13
Paul Flynn
Sir Alan Meale
Mr Dennis Skinner
Mr Mike Hancock
Ms Margaret Ritchie
Martin Caton
*18
Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House commends the judgement of City analysts Liberum Capital who say that the Hinkley Point nuclear power station deal is economically insane offering a price for electricity at double the going rate, index linked and guaranteed for 35 years; agrees with the head of Ineos, Jim Ratcliffe, that the price of £95 per megawatt hour agreed with Électricité de France is a rip-off especially when the company simultaneously agreed a price of £38 for French customers; is alarmed that future British industry and domestic users will be forced to buy some of the most expensive electricity in the world, adding to the burdens of domestic bills and putting industry at a competitive disadvantage; and calls for a full disclosure of the deal and parliamentary debate.

888 ROMANIAN AND BULGARIAN CITIZENS INTENDING TO WORK AND LIVE IN THE UK FROM 1 JANUARY 2014 17:12:13
Mr Frank Field
Mr Peter Bone
Kate Hoey
Nicholas Soames
Nigel Mills
Jim Shannon
*12
Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House notes the lifting of Transitional Provisions set out in Article 20 and Annexes VI and VII of the European Communities No. 2 (2005) Treaty from 1 January 2014 with reference to the movement of Romanian and Bulgarian citizens intending to work and live in the UK; acknowledges that there are nearly one million young people out of work in this country; and therefore urges the Government not to lift Transitional Provisions on the movement of Romanian and Bulgarian citizens intending to work and live in the UK while unemployment and youth unemployment remain so high in this country.

892 BEER DUTY AND THE 2014 BUDGET 18:12:13
Andrew Griffiths
Charlotte Leslie
Greg Mulholland
Sir Tony Cunningham
Mr Elfyn Llwyd
Mr James Gray
*18
Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House welcomes the ending of the beer duty escalator and the impact of the Chancellor of the Exchequer's historic beer duty cut in the 2013 Budget, the first such cut since 1959, in supporting the growth of Britain's breweries and underpinning confidence in the UK's pubs; and urges the Government to sustain this momentum by considering the case for a further freeze in beer duty in the 2014 Budget which would secure over 2,000 jobs in pubs up and down the land and help reduce the cost of living for hard-working men and women.

893 RAIL FARES FREEZE AND SERVICE IMPROVEMENTS 18:12:13
Teresa Pearce
Katy Clark
Sir Gerald Kaufman
John McDonnell
Grahame M. Morris
Mrs Linda Riordan
*23
Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House notes that since 2008 rail fares have risen three times faster than wages; is concerned that these increases have taken place while rail companies have been making substantial profits; further notes that hard-pressed rail passengers, on top of energy and water price rises, are due to face further fare increases in the New Year; and calls for urgent consideration of a freeze in rail fares and service improvements financed by a windfall tax on the profits of rail companies which would be part of a first phase of consideration of returning the railways to public ownership to ensure a better deal for both the taxpayer and fare-payer.

894 FUTURE OF UK TRAIN MANUFACTURING 18:12:13
Chris Williamson
Kelvin Hopkins
Mrs Linda Riordan
Teresa Pearce
John McDonnell
Jeremy Corbyn
*20
Sammy Wilson Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House notes that Bombardier in Derby is the UK's last train manufacturing facility; understands that if Bombardier does not win the Crossrail contract then the plant will close and end train manufacturing in the nation that gave the railways to the world; is deeply concerned that the closure of the Bombardier plant would have a devastating impact on the region and supply chain with the loss of existing train manufacturing skills, scores of apprenticeships and at least 10,000 jobs; further notes that the Crossrail contract is co-sponsored by the Mayor of London and Department for Transport; and urges both the Mayor and the Government to do all they can to ensure the survival of UK train manufacturing.

895 PLANNING LAWS AND FIXED ODDS BETTING TERMINALS 18:12:13
Mr Tom Watson
Jeremy Corbyn
Hugh Bayley
John McDonnell
Kelvin Hopkins
Sir Peter Bottomley
*13
Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House notes the increase in the number of betting shops in deprived areas, that betting shops are currently in the same use class as banks and building societies, allowing them to be opened with no planning consent required for change of use in some cases and that most of the revenue generated from betting shops is now from high reward fixed odds betting terminals rather than from traditional betting on sport and track events; further notes that the Portas Review into the future of high streets describes gaming outlets as a blight on the high street, that their proliferation is creating unsightly gambling clusters on struggling retail hotspots and that in many areas, crime and anti-social disorder has been associated with a proliferation of betting shops; believes that local authorities should be empowered to decide whether or not to give approval to existing and additional gambling venues in their community; and calls on the Government to place betting shops in a new separate planning use class, allowing local authority planning committees to control them and to amend the Gambling Act to allow council licensing committees to take into account the cumulative impact of a proliferation of gambling activities when considering applications.

897 SUPPORT FOR SIXTH FORM COLLEGES 18:12:13
Austin Mitchell
Jeremy Corbyn
Mr Jim Cunningham
John McDonnell
Kelvin Hopkins
Sir Peter Bottomley
*12
Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House believes in the excellent contribution made by sixth form colleges in providing students with a wide range of courses, subjects and an atmosphere akin to that of a university; emphasises the view of the National Audit Office that sixth form colleges are the most successful and cost-effective providers of post-16 education; urges the Government to end the present discrimination against colleges in favour of sixth forms in schools; feels that colleges and school sixth forms should be put on an equal funding basis by the Government reversing its decision to withhold the VAT rebate proposed from colleges and by restoring the cuts which have been made to tutorial and support funding, to enrichment and careers education, as well as the cuts in the overall funding for students over 16 and, now the proposed 17.5 per cent reduction in funding for students aged 18; further emphasises that this vulnerable group of 18 year olds is in a critical year of transition and includes students who have lost time through illness, a change in career plans, students who have had to repeat their level 2 qualifications and students who have been excluded from sixth forms in schools; and points out that the Government's pledge not to cut education budgets is not being honoured by these cuts.

900 EVE'S LAW AND VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 18:12:13
Robert Flello
Albert Owen
Chris Ruane
Sir Tony Cunningham
Andrew George
Mark Durkan
*29
Jim Fitzpatrick Mark Tami Chris Williamson Jim Dowd Teresa Pearce Mr Dai Havard Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House recognises that victims of domestic violence and abuse are being placed at risk when forced to give their safe address in open court in unrelated proceedings; supports Eve's Law to address this dangerous anomaly; further supports Eve's Marker which would red flag the personal information of a victim of abuse as confidential and highly sensitive and would ensure that the data would never be publicly disclosed unless exceptional circumstances demanded it; notes that Eve's Law would protect victims of domestic violence in court on an unrelated matter; further notes that Eve's Law would close an anomaly which may deter victims of domestic violence from reporting abuse; and urges the Government to introduce Eve's Law.

901 HUMAN RIGHTS IN BAHRAIN 19:12:13
Jeremy Corbyn
Katy Clark
John McDonnell
Mr David Anderson
Jonathan Edwards
Kelvin Hopkins
*12
Dr Julian Huppert Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House notes that despite the publication of the Bahrain Commission of Inquiry Report in 2011 which chronicled torture and extrajudicial killing regrets that many violations of human rights continue; is shocked that there are 3,000 political prisoners, children in detention, citizenship removed from activists and arbitrary arrests amongst the many violations of human rights independently reported; and calls on the Government to make the strongest possible representations to the government of Bahrain and to refuse all arms and crowd control equipment exports to Bahrain.

902 EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP LIMITS 19:12:13
Mr Graham Brady
Mr Adrian Bailey
Sir Menzies Campbell
David Simpson
Mark Durkan
Mr Elfyn Llwyd
*22
Mr David Ward Mark Lazarowicz Stephen Gilbert Mr Gregory Campbell Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House welcomes the Government's decision to double the maximum savings limits for employees who save and invest in a Save As You Earn (SAYE) plan to £500 a month from 2014; further welcomes the decision to increase the annual free shares limit in a share incentive plan (SIP) to £600 and the SIP partnership shares limit to £1,800; notes these increases have the potential to help over two million UK employees save and invest more for their own futures; and further notes the important role that not-for-profit organisation IFS ProShare has played in securing this positive change and that parliamentarians from the SNP, Plaid Cymru, Green Party, Liberal Democrats, Labour, DUP, SDLP and the Conservative Party have all contributed to making this long overdue change a reality.

903 NATIONAL POLLINATOR STRATEGY 19:12:13
Mrs Anne Main
Sir Peter Bottomley
Mark Durkan
John McDonnell
Bob Blackman
Martin Caton
*13
Mr Gordon Marsden Joan Walley Mr Roger Godsiff

That this House recognises that insect pollinators are in decline in the UK; acknowledges that this can have a devastating knock on effect for farmers and food production and could lead to increased inflationary pressures on food prices; notes that the Government has committed to rolling out a National Pollinator Strategy in May 2014; and calls on the Government to redouble its efforts to tackle this issue by engaging with environment groups and experts to formulate a strategy for halting the decline in the number of insect pollinators and to rejuvenate numbers in the UK.

904 ENERGY DEMAND REDUCTION 19:12:13
Sir Andrew Stunell
Zac Goldsmith
Dr Alan Whitehead
Joan Walley
Mr John Leech
Mark Durkan
*20
Andrew George

That this House welcomes the publication by the Department for Energy and Climate Change of the report, Energy Efficiency Opportunity in the UK, in November 2012 which shows the potential for cost effectively reducing the demand for electricity by 69TWh by 2020, for gas by 74TWh by 2020 and for oil and other fuels by 53TWh by 2020; further welcomes the publication of the report, Electricity Demand Reduction, in May 2013 which showed that a further 32TWh of electricity could be saved by 2030; and so supports the proposals contained in the Energy Demand Reduction Bill for the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change to draw up and implement a strategy to achieve those reductions.

905 SUPPORT FOR CLAIMANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND ASYLUM ACT 1999 6:1:14
Mr Barry Sheerman
Sir Peter Bottomley
Ms Margaret Ritchie
Mark Durkan
Jim Dobbin
Martin Caton
*8
Mr David Ward John McDonnell

That this House is concerned that support rates under section 4 and section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 are very austere; notes that a maximum payment of £35.39 per person per week is barely half the sum of income support and is often not sufficient to cover essential medical, food and transport costs; deems the maximum level of support of just £5.06 per person per day as a strong driver of asylum seekers' social exclusion in society; urges the Government to raise the support rates under section 4 and section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 to a minimum of £45.44 per person per week, representing 80 per cent. of income support, for single adults; recognises that the cashless payment methods under which section 4 benefits are issued place detrimental limits on how families and individuals can buy fundamental goods and services and access transport; believes that restrictions on the use of the cashless payment method unfairly favour just nine of the UK's largest retailers, which damages local businesses; supports a move towards cash methods for distributing support payments; and urges the Government to reassess the conditions used to determine granting of support rates under section 4 so that they include people who are currently being refused or withdrawn from support but who clearly have substantial health needs as was the case previously.

906 STUDY OF TEXTILES AT BLYTHE HOUSE 6:1:14
Mr Barry Sheerman
Sir Peter Bottomley
Dr Julian Lewis
David Simpson
Martin Caton
Mr David Ward
*8
John McDonnell Mr Gordon Marsden

That this House welcomes the opening of the Victoria and Albert Museum's new centre for the study of textiles at Blythe House, the Clothworkers Centre for the Study of Conservation of Textiles and Fashion, and congratulates it on its careful renovation of this listed building; applauds the Victoria and Albert Museum's moves towards greater accessibility to its collections, and to such cutting edge facilities in the study and conservation of textiles; believes that, with 104,000 objects all amassed in one building, this is a hugely valuable collection for the nation and an unparalleled resource for students and the creative industries that ought to be protected; and further believes that universities and businesses across the country should be encouraged to make use of this state-of-the-art facility.

907 LEGAL RECOGNITION FOR THOSE WHO DO NOT ASSOCIATE WITH A PARTICULAR GENDER (No. 2) 6:1:14
Dr Julian Huppert
Sir Peter Bottomley
Mr Mike Hancock
Kelvin Hopkins
Martin Caton
Mr David Ward
*9
John McDonnell Chris Williamson Andrew George

That this House recognises the issues faced by those in the UK who identify themselves as non-gender, bi-gender or intersex; believes that many of those who are non-gendered or bi-gendered feel compromised and diminished as a result of inappropriate gender references on their personal identity information; acknowledges that all passports issued by HM Passport Office are currently gender-specific and it is therefore not possible to obtain a passport that contains no reference to gendered identity; understands that, alongside F (Female) and M (Male), the International Civil Aviation Organisation's Document 9303 already contains X (unspecified) as a permitted character for three permitted characters under the mandatory sex element for machine-readable travel documents; notes that in Australia and New Zealand citizens are able to obtain a non-gender specific X passport and that India, Nepal and Pakistan also recognise the legitimacy of X as a preferred option when M and F are not appropriate; further believes that allowing this possibility in the UK would go a long way to amend this discriminatory policy which denies non-gendered and bi-gendered people a legitimate identity; and therefore urges the Government and HM Passport Office to make non-gender-specific X passports available to those UK passport holders who do not identify with a particular gender.

908 ENERGY COMPANIES CHARGES FOR PAYMENT OTHER THAN BY DIRECT DEBIT 6:1:14
Robert Halfon
Sir Peter Bottomley
Jim Shannon
Jim Dobbin
Mr Mike Hancock
Dr Julian Lewis
*11
Martin Caton Mr David Ward Mr Mike Weir Sammy Wilson Andrew George

That this House is disappointed that the Co-operative Energy company has contacted its customers to say that they will be charged an extra £63 if they do not begin to pay their bills by direct debit; notes that the Government is taking measures to reduce energy bills by an average of £50; further notes that this move will hurt the poorest the most; believes that energy companies should not try to recoup this money by raising money in other areas; and calls for Co-operative Energy to treat all its customers fairly, regardless of their chosen payment method.

909 THREATS TO ANABEL HERNÁNDEZ 6:1:14
Jeremy Corbyn
John McDonnell
Jim Sheridan
Kelvin Hopkins
Mark Durkan
Mr Elfyn Llwyd
*16
Martin Caton Mr Mike Weir Andrew George

That this House salutes the bravery of Mexican journalist Anabel Hernández whose recently published book on Narco Wars has highlighted issues of security and corruption in Mexico; is appalled that in common with many investigative journalists she faces constant death threats; notes that on 19 December 2013 her home was invaded by an armed gang in an attempt to find her and threaten her life; supports campaigns to secure the freedom and security of journalists to go about their work; and calls on the authorities in Mexico to ensure the safety and security of Anabel Hernández and the many serious investigative journalists who are also constantly threatened.

910 LEGAL ADVISERS AND INCOME FROM THE STATE 6:1:14
John Hemming
Martin Caton
*2

That this House notes that under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 public authorities are required to declare their payments for legal services to legal organisations; further notes that there are concerns about some legal advisers acting against public authorities from which they also receive substantial sums; further notes that this would give rise to a conflict of interest; and believes that the regulators should require legal advisers that receive payments from public authorities to declare those payments so potential clients would be able to recognise whether or not they might be subject to such a conflict of interest.

911 STATUTORY EMPLOYMENT LEAVE FOR BEREAVED PARENTS 6:1:14
Mr Tom Harris
Jim Shannon
Ms Margaret Ritchie
Jim Dobbin
Mr James Gray
Sir Alan Meale
*30
Martin Caton Mr Mike Weir John McDonnell Andrew George

That this House believes that parents who suffer the death of a child should have the right to paid time off from their employer in order to grieve; recognises that most employers offer flexibility and support to employees in such tragic circumstances; deplores the significant number of employers who force bereaved parents to go back to work too early or take sick leave in order to grieve; congratulates the Jack's Rainbow campaign for highlighting the injustice that parents who suffer such a tragic loss have no statutory right to paid employment leave; and calls on the Government to amend the Employment Rights Act 1996 to enshrine in law the right to statutory bereavement leave for parents.

912 CAMP LIBERTY - ISSUING OF VISAS 7:1:14
Sir Alan Meale
Mark Durkan
Sir Peter Bottomley
Mr Mike Weir
Jim Shannon
John McDonnell
*9
Jim Dobbin Martin Caton Mr Mike Hancock

That this House is aware of the plight of the 3,000 residents of Camp Liberty in Iraq who have been promised United Nations protection but who instead regularly face violence, assaults, physical torture and intimidation; understands also that the Iraqi authority frequently denies relatives visas to visit their loved ones; and urges the UK Government to inform the controlling regime that such behaviour is neither acceptable nor in the spirit of freedom, justice or democracy.

913 INTEREST RATES AND HOUSEHOLD DEBT 7:1:14
Ms Margaret Ritchie
Mr Mike Weir
Jim Shannon
Jim Dobbin
Mr Gregory Campbell
Martin Caton
*7
Mark Durkan

That this House recognises the difficult economic times and financial challenges faced by families; highlights the impact that a rise in the base rate of interest would have on homeowners who would face increasing mortgage demands; draws attention to a recent report by the Resolution Foundation which demonstrates that a rise in interest rates could put two million households into a dangerous financial situation, with over half of these cases involving families with children; acknowledges that many homeowners already face a strain on their household income from rising petrol prices and home energy costs; further recognises that household debt held on credit cards, especially after Christmas, will bring a further burden to many people; and urges the Government to bring forward measures to prevent an escalating household debt crisis.

914 MELBOURNE DECLARATION ON DIABETES 8:1:14
Mr Adrian Sanders [R]
Michael Connarty
Mark Durkan
Sir Peter Bottomley
Andrew George
Robert Halfon
*6

That this House notes that the first meeting of the Global Parliamentary Champions for Diabetes Forum was held in Melbourne from 30 November to 2 December 2013 and was attended by parliamentarians from over 50 countries; understands that there are an estimated 382 million people with diabetes and that this number is expected to rise to 592 million by 2035, that 80 per cent of people with diabetes live in low and middle-income countries, and that diabetes will have caused 5.1 million deaths in 2013, one every six seconds; further notes that the 66th World Health Assembly held in May 2013 has adopted nine global targets and 25 indicators to help address the non-communicable diseases (NCD) pandemic and that diabetes is the only one of the four major NCDs with its own global target, which is to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025; congratulates the 90 nations that have signed the Melbourne Declaration on Diabetes; and urges hon. Members to join those advocating for increased prevention, better diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in the UK.

[R] Relevant Interest declared
915 THAMES IRONWORKS HERITAGE TRUST 8:1:14
Jim Fitzpatrick
Michael Connarty
Sir Peter Bottomley
*3

That this House supports the Thames Ironworks Heritage Trust's aims of recuperating the heritage of the shipbuilding heritage of London, primarily through the restoration of lifeboats made by the Thames Ironworks and Shipbuilding Company Limited for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution over 100 years ago; commends its goal of re-establishing boat building and restoration skills in east London via the development of apprenticeships; and welcomes its plan to put these boats back to use providing educational tours of the waterways of east London, and in doing so encourages the relevant authorities that recalling the heritage of the East End is an important part of the legacy of London 2012 and that community-led projects such as the Thames Ironworks Heritage Trust are deserving of a place within that legacy.

916 EAST LONDON RIVER CROSSINGS 8:1:14
Jim Fitzpatrick
Michael Connarty
Sir Peter Bottomley
*3

That this House believes there is a need for additional road crossings on the River Thames east of Tower Bridge; further believes that this is best delivered by a tunnel between Silvertown and the Greenwich Peninsula and a bridge between Beckton and Thamesmead; notes that London's population is set to reach 10 million by 2030 and that the majority of its growth will take place in the East and South East of London; further notes that there are 22 road crossings in London west of Tower Bridge and just two to the east; further notes that opinion polling commissioned by the London Borough of Newham showed that 77 per cent of residents believed that there should be additional river crossings in East and South East London and 71 per cent would prefer a bridge rather than a ferry to connect Beckton and Thamesmead; further notes an economic impact study by Peter Brett Associates that estimates a bridge between Beckton and Thamesmead would add £55.7 million a year to the local economy, which is 10 times more than a comparable estimate for a ferry; further notes that additional fixed crossings are supported by key London business groups, including the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry; and calls on Transport for London to publish plans for new fixed river crossings between the Greenwich Peninsula and Silvertown and between Thamesmead and Beckton as soon as possible.

917 DOMESTIC ABUSE 8:1:14
Mr Elfyn Llwyd
Sir Bob Russell
Jenny Chapman
John McDonnell
Sandra Osborne
Caroline Lucas
*11
Gordon Henderson Mr John Leech Andrew George Robert Halfon Mark Durkan

That this House believes that the level of domestic abuse in the UK is unacceptable, that the number of victims reporting incidents is extremely low and that the number of alleged perpetrators convicted is unsatisfactory; further believes that all criminal justice professionals should receive training on the subject of domestic abuse; and asks the Government to consider introducing a specific law of domestic abuse, which would take into account courses of conduct and repetitive abusive behaviour.

918 RELEASE OF DOCUMENTATION ABOUT THE 1984-85 MINERS' STRIKE 8:1:14
Ian Lavery
Mr David Hamilton
Mr Dennis Skinner
Mr Ronnie Campbell
Mr David Anderson
Mr Jim Hood
*22
Chris Williamson Ian Mearns Grahame M. Morris John Cryer Paul Flynn Dame Anne Begg Mr David Crausby Jim Dobbin Jim Sheridan Steve Rotheram Kelvin Hopkins Sir Alan Meale Mr David Winnick Andrew George Mr Stephen Hepburn Mark Durkan

That this House is appalled to learn what thousands of people in mining communities have strongly suspected for 30 years in the wake of the release of the Cabinet papers relating to the 1984-85 miners' strike, that senior Cabinet ministers, including the Prime Minister, micromanaged the Government's side of the strike, whilst publicly claiming to be innocent bystanders; notes that, all along, the National Coal Board had the intention to close over 70 collieries whilst publicly claiming the number to be around 20; further notes that senior Cabinet Ministers deliberately misled the country; further notes that when those striking to protect their communities seemed to be on the verge of victory, the Government plotted to bring in the armed forces to avoid defeat; and furthermore demands a full independent inquiry into the then Government's handling of the 1984-85 miners' strike.

919 LIVING WAGE AND ROYAL OPERA HOUSE CLEANERS 8:1:14
John McDonnell
Austin Mitchell
*2

That this House notes that the cleaners employed by MITIE, under contract at the Royal Opera House, have voted for strike action because they are paid below the London Living Wage; urges the Royal Opera House to take appropriate steps to raise the wages of its cleaners to the London Living Wage of £8.80 per hour; further notes that the cleaners have seen their tea break abolished under threat of disciplinary action; and calls for this to be restored, for the cleaners to be treated with respect and dignity at work and for their trade union IWGB to be fully recognised.

920 MINIMUM WAGE 8:1:14
John Hemming
Robert Halfon
*2

That this House notes the Prime Minister's suggestion of a substantial increase in the minimum wage; further notes that the support of The Sun for this to happen before the General Election; agrees that it would be good to have a substantial increase in the minimum wage before the General Election; and calls for the Government to review this issue with a view to how it may be achieved.

921 ELECTORAL COMMISSION AND VOTER ID 8:1:14
John Hemming
*1

That this House notes the historic complacency of successive governments about electoral fraud other than in Northern Ireland; recognises that progress has been made to deal with postal vote fraud, but agrees with the Electoral Commission that personation remains a traceless crime outside Northern Ireland; welcomes the Electoral Commission's suggestion that a system of voter verification is needed; and calls for action to be taken to improve the integrity of the electoral system in England, Scotland and Wales.

922 MISSING PEOPLE 8:1:14
Sir Bob Russell
*1

That this House recognises the huge distress caused to almost 200,000 families every year whose relatives go missing, and the potential risks faced by those who are missing; welcomes the support provided to missing people and their families by the charity Missing People; notes the partnership established between the trade body Outdoor Media Centre and Missing People in providing and generating digital billboard publicity, without charge, to assist the search for missing people; celebrates that on 13 November 2013 the one hundredth person was found safe and well since the launch of this initiative; and encourages hon. and right hon Members to support this initiative in their constituencies to increase the chance of even more missing children and adults being found by supporting the partnership so that publicity campaigns reach as many people as possible, and by encouraging members of the public to join the search through the Missing People charity.

923 RESEARCH ON THE EFFECT ON THE ECONOMY OF PUBCO REFORMS 8:1:14
Greg Mulholland
*1

That this House welcomes the research from the Federation of Small Businesses that shows that the introduction of a statutory code of practice including a market rent-only option for the large pub-owning companies would benefit the UK economy by an estimated £78 million; notes that the research, conducted anonymously through a market research company, shows that licensees would invest more in their pubs, employ more staff and stock a wider selection of beers; further notes that 9,888 pubs would take on a new member of staff or increase staff hours creating £48,666,758 of additional wages per year, 10,359 pubs would spend money on maintenance, meaning an extra £10,359,030 to the economy, 6,698 pubs would spend money on modernisation, meaning an extra £9,697,984 to the economy, and that 9,796 pubs would spend more on advertising and websites, meaning an extra £9,796,000 to the economy; further notes that the research also shows that 8,213 pubs would offer a wider range of beers, benefiting small breweries and 8,614 pubs in the UK would use the extra profits to bring down the price of a pint and that 98 per cent of tenants said they would have more confidence in the future of their business; believes that this powerful evidence shows the very strong case for the market rent-only option as the way to rejuvenate the pub sector; and calls on the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to act on this and implement the Business, Innovation and Skills Select Committee market rent-only option for companies with more than 500 pubs.

924 PUB CLOSURE FIGURES 8:1:14
Greg Mulholland
*1

That this House expresses concern at the misinformation supplied to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, hon and right hon. Members and the media by large pub companies and their lobbyists the British Beer and Pub Association (BBPA) regarding pub closures; notes the report by the All-Party Parliamentary Save the Pub Group, working with CGA Strategy, which exposes that false statements have been made; further notes that CGA figures show that between December 2005 and March 2013, 5,117 non-managed pubs closed compared with only 2,131 free trade pubs; further notes that BBPA's own figures show that over 10 years non-managed pubs decreased by over 8,000 whilst the free trade sector actually expanded by 1,600; condemns the myth that has been peddled suggesting that more free of tie pubs have closed than tied pubs; further notes that this has now been debunked and should not be repeated; further notes that the figures clearly show that tenanted and leased pubs have closed in greater number than free trade pubs, without even counting the thousands of temporary closures of pubco pubs each year; further notes the damning disposal figures with Enterprise Inns and Punch Taverns collectively disposing of over 5,000 pubs between 2008 and 2012, a third of all their pubs in just four years; expresses concern that false information has been taken at face value by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, HM Treasury and the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) leading to inappropriate assessments; calls for an investigation into this; and further calls on the Government and the OFT to accept the real picture of pub closures and to act accordingly.

925 WHITEHOUSE CONSULTANCY AND OBESITY WEEK 8:1:14
Paul Flynn
*1

That this House fears a repeat of the scandal of 2008 when an anti-obesity charity deceived conscientious hon. Members into supporting the commercial interests of the Obesity Awareness and Solutions Trust (Toast) that boasted of parliamentary influence while failing to declare its financial links to the weight-loss industry; notes the lobbyist Christopher Whitehouse said that his Whitehouse Consultancy had acquired 21 parliamentary patrons for Toast; is alarmed that National Obesity Awareness Week 2014 is being promoted by the same lobbyist whose firm still has many links to commercial weight loss enterprises; and regrets if there is again confusion between a worthy health campaign and mercenary interests that could gravely embarrass hon. Members.

926 GUIDE AND HEARING DOG OWNERS 8:1:14
Mr Mike Hancock
*1

That this House congratulates and supports the Hearing Dogs for Deaf People and Guide Dogs for the Blind Association on their work to raise awareness and educate service providers on providing equal access for guide and hearing dog owners; recognises that despite amendments to the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, the Hearing Dogs for Deaf People have found that 80 per cent of hearing dog recipients have been refused access on one or more occasions; further recognises that hearing and guide dog owners are more reliant on public and private transport and so this affects confidence and independence; notes that guide and hearing dogs users are left financially responsible for prosecution of those who breach the Disability Discrimination Act 1995; and urges the Government to review current legislation and access to legal services at the earliest possible opportunity.

Prepared 9th January 2014